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Desi

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Incredible work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-08-2020

This book, together with 'Trauma and Memory' by Levine, were instrumental in teaching me how important it is to be connected with and paying attention to my body and what it can tell me, which is a big leap for someone who has been living above the neck for 30+ years.

1 person found this helpful

Listen to clinical chapters first IMO

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-08-2020

The first half of the book is about the anatomical map of the brain that helps us locate the different functions of the brain. However, I never had an ear for anatomy or just remembering stuff, so I found that front-loading the first half of the book with this abstract info was a little too much for me, and I bounced off it. I eventually decided to skip to the second half of the book (stories from clinical practice) and it was FAR better and more approachable to me. I may be able to revisit the earlier chapters with some applicable information to help me. I have scored the performance somewhat low because Siegel's performance is adequate but not great. His reading of his other book, 'The Neurobiology of We' is much improved, conversational with varying pace and pitch, and very easy to follow.

2 people found this helpful

Not too useful for science theses

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-2019

I am a PhD student in the life sciences. I knew that this book was written for students of the Humanities (particularly literature, art history, etc.), but I felt that there might still be something useful in here for me, so I gave it a try. Unfortunately, I did not find much in this book that was applicable or even new to me. One key caveat is that the book is not about PhD theses/dissertations. I think the thesis Eco is writing about is more like an Honours thesis, or perhaps a small Masters thesis. - Section 1 is about why a thesis is a worthwhile thing to write. - Section 2 is about choosing a thesis topic. There is some good advice about choosing a topic based on the amount of literature there is for it, but this information is not relevant to science since hundreds of new papers come out every month. The best take-away is: Define your thesis topic well so that you know where to start and stop. - Section 3 is about doing bibliographic research in meatspace libraries and collections. You may find value in adopting some aspects of Eco's index card bibliography system, but now we have Zotero with subfolders, recursive collections, notes, keywords, and full-text search. Eco had one good point, paraphrased to something like: "Students with access to only small libraries may not have many sources, but they own every word." That's something that's very hard for science students to do nowadays. - Section 4 is more about the index card system and how to use it to construct a work plan/thesis outline. This is good advice, but not new. - Section 5 is, finally, about writing the thesis. But this section is not really about structuring a thesis, making ideas flow, producing a convincing argument, etc. Instead, Eco spends a lot of time going over basic things like how to quote, how to cite, how to avoid plagiarising. Remember that this book is for undergrads/Masters students. - Section 6 is about formatting the thesis. Margins, underlining, capitalisation, foreign accents, appendices. These are things that your institution will specifically request anyway. Overall, I got very little from the book that was relevant to my needs. If you're a science PhD looking for something helpful, I instead strongly recommend: 1. 'Scientific Writing = Thinking in Words' by David Lindsay 2. 'Scientific Writing: A Reader and Writer's Guide' by Jean-Luc Lebrun 3. O’Connor, Timothy R., and Gerald P. Holmquist. “Algorithm for Writing a Scientific Manuscript.” Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 37, no. 6 (2009): 344–48. https://doi.org/10.1002/bmb.20329.

2 people found this helpful

To be clear, this is a series of recorded public lectures

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-01-2018

If you’re expecting a book, this isn’t a book. This is a series of recorded lectures over the course of some kind of multi-day conference for the general public. The content is really well-delivered, clear and funny and well paced. In the first chapter, Brené sometimes forgets that she is being recorded and so fails to describe things like facial expressions, but it seems that she was reminded because the later chapters have these visual components properly described. I found a lot of value in the content presented here, mostly in having these ideas properly vocalised in a way that I had never heard before. A great purchase!