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Rachel

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Fascinating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-07-2019

It’s something you hear more and more about these days - online dates turning out to be conmen and conwomen. This book was so interesting and well-written. I devoured it. What happened to the author could really have happened to any of us.

3 people found this helpful

Great introduction to the subject

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-06-2019

I had seen this book a number of times before I decided to give it a go and I am glad that I did. I wasn’t particularly interested in shame and a few of the reviews said that the subject matter was heavy going so it took me a while to decide to try it, but I’m glad I did. I really enjoyed this. I thought it was more practical than the other Brene Brown book I have read. It has inspired me to think differently about my own shame perspective.

A shallow look at a real issue

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-2019

I tried to like this, really I did. My first problem with this book came at the outset when the author waxed lyrical about the movement she “founded”. Say what? Body positivity has been around for a long, long time and a lot of thinkers have been writing about it. Similarly, a lot of academics have dedicated their whole careers to body image studies. Rebranding body positivity as “embrace” or whatever you want to call it does not mean you invented anything. Secondly, the constant references to social media were excruciating. At one point - still in the introductory bit I think - the author/narrator tells us about a fabulous person, whose main claim to fabulousness is the fact she has X number of Instagram followers and if we don’t already, we should follow her on social media immediately. As if the emphasis on social media and its artificial reality isn’t a major contributor to body image problems! The book had a shallow, gushing quality with the author constantly reminding us about her amazing journey to social media stardom and I just can’t believe it, and it all began at my kitchen table, but I’ve done something amazing! You’ve invented a catchy tag line to promote ideas you didn’t come up with. I really did try to get into it but it wasn’t for me. I’m clearly in the minority however so maybe it will do some good with helping others get interested in body image the wealth of great research out there on the subject.

Entertaining, accessible psychology

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-2019

I really liked this. It's entertaining to hear different theories about happiness and I liked the way each theory can be practised in our own modern lives. It was one of those books where you can listen to it bit-by-bit without forgetting what it was about.

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-05-2019

I have never come across this kind of work before - using myths and fairytales to illustrate women’s issues with food - so it was very interesting. Overall, I liked it. It made me think that disordered eating among women is a social problem because of the stories we tell ourselves about how we should be as women.

Great story - I struggled with the narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-05-2019

I really liked Tandoh's writing style and her over-the-top descriptions suit her subject. I really struggled with her narration though. She speaks in a flat monotone about what should be an uplifting subject. I found her narration style negative, as if she were speaking about something very difficult and painful, when what she is describing is actually a celebration of food. I would not have gotten past this if it wasn't for the quality content of the writing. I got used to it more as I got into the book but it continued to bother me right to end.

Some good points but overly aggressive

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-05-2019

Ford has some good ideas about what it means to be a woman in Australia. I think that some of her message is lost in the aggressive way that she talks about men's privilege. I think that we can have discussions about feminism and male privilege without necessarily being combative but Ford approaches every topic with her boxing gloves on. I guess I could have figured that out from the title of the book. Overall, I liked it more than I disliked it but I think she goes a bit too far in places, e.g. she bathes in the tears of privileged men. I wondered if some of her language choices were deliberate attempts at controversy, which can get to be a bit too much when used quite so often.

Try it, even if it's not your usual thing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-05-2019

I'm glad I bothered with this book. I had heard of it from a few different sources but I didn't read it because I'm not particularly passionate about fat acceptance. However, I was wrong to disregard it because you do not need to be a body positivity warrior to enjoy this book. It is an entertaining story, and I enjoyed hearing about the author's experiences living as a fat woman. I was saddened to hear about how much abuse she is subject to just because she is fat. This book made me think about how we judge the bodies of others and all the reasons why I need to be more aware of my own judgments about bodies. I don't agree with the author's position that she is overweight and unable to lose weight because she has PCOS, but I liked her story nonetheless. You don't have to agree with her to be able to see her perspective.

Practical advice on mindful eating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-2019

I liked this book because it isn’t just theory and idealism, the author uses real people to demonstrate her ideas and offers practical suggestions for how to integrate the concepts into your life. I struggle with some of the mindful eating ideas because they seem more about spirituality, which is not something I am particularly interested in. I did not feel like the author was trying to convert me to Buddhism, which was a nice change. I really liked this book and will read it again. Read it if you are interested in mindful eating but aren’t too keen on the idea of stopping your life to gaze deep into your inner soul every time you sit down to lunch.

1 person found this helpful

A real eye opener

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-2019

I have been turned off books about body love because they seem too wishy-washy to me - I love me, I’m beautiful, blah blah blah. This was nothing at all like that. It shows how negative beliefs about our bodies are part of the social structures that we live in but it also tells us how we can start to effect positive change. I loved the way this book was not focused on weight but on bodies generally. It has really enlightened me to way I think about difference and how I can be more inclusive toward others.