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  • 50 Economics Classics

  • Your Shortcut to the Most Important Ideas on Capitalism, Finance, and the Global Economy
  • By: Tom Butler-Bowdon
  • Narrated by: John Chancer
  • Length: 16 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4

Understand the greatest books in economics with the latest volume in the best-selling 50 Classics series. From Karl Marx to Naomi Klein, from The Wealth of Nations to Piketty's Capital, here are the 50 most important titles on finance and world economy distilled. 50 Economics Classics considers the legacy of some of the great names including Ricardo, Keynes, Malthus and Friedman and highlights the work of newer writers including Piketty, Luigi Zingales and Enrico Moretti.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good balance of traditional left and right wing economics ideas

  • By Anonymous User on 30-07-2018

Good balance of traditional left and right wing economics ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-07-2018

This book is a great start to understanding economics. It shows you the basics and references books which relate to each chapter and even had a ‘in a nutshell’ idea of each chapter for easy reference.

My criticism would be that some ideas seems to contradict each other in terms of ‘what’s the best plan for x situation’ but I suppose that’s very apt because the book demonstrates that there are multiple ideas from different perspectives of how economics works (and doesn’t). Very interesting and great gateway to actually being interested in economics.

  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: William Roberts
  • Length: 18 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,639
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,471
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,463

A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not what I expected but brilliant!

  • By Michael on 27-11-2015

Engaging Read, Some Outdated (and amended) facts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-2018

Great read and fantastic voice performance - really engaging. Since this talks about science it's inevitable that some facts are put of date. Like the number of elements, evolution theories, and that 'glass is a liquid' which caught my attention (it's a myth).

However, the hard copy of this text has amendments and it's still easy to learn and be entertained.

  • The Righteous Mind

  • Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion
  • By: Jonathan Haidt
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Haidt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154

In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition - the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are wrong. Haidt shows us how these intuitions differ across cultures, including the cultures of the political left and right.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • everyone needs to listen to this book

  • By Ken on 02-05-2017

Interesting and Mind Opening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-2018

This book has helped me understand more about human nature and why I find it so hard to understand others and their morals. It helps us understand why people choose some things over others, why many ask ‘how can they believe THAT’S the best way to act!’

While it’s very detailed in the theory and supporting arguments, it does have flaws in my opinion. One of which is that they quantise morals into categories, but fail to establish WHY we should value one more than another. While I understand the use of other moral ‘tastes’ as he put it, I still have trouble understanding why kindness and rationalism shouldn’t be a core concern. There seemed to be a mixed message ‘don’t trust our intuition’ but also ‘don’t base our actions/moral matrix on rational thought.’

Which is it? Should we trust the rider or elephant when making moral matrices?

Perhaps I misunderstood, maybe he meant that our instinctual morals aren’t based on rational thought but ought to be - as he then explained the rational reason for each moral ‘taste’ and it’s benefits.

But overall this book is incredibly helpful in understanding both political extremes on the spectrum and seeing values in your “opponent”. Truly worth the read!