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Good Advice - Science is a little outdated

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-10-2019

Good advice and it movtiates you to get goals completed and look for success. However you can REALLY tell this was written in the 1930s with its imagination of how science works, but I will note that while the science mechanics are incorrect the advice is still valid. Of course there isn't ACTUAL telepathic thoughts, but your emotions around other people do affect them and how they treat you through subconscious triggers we notice. There is a lot of anecdotal evidence but from the other psychological books I've read these appear to be valid in the most part - so once again, the advice in this book is valid. It's a little funny how a man during the 1930s would completely ignore the social and environmental barriers some people face such as women, queer people, and people of colour and puts it down to 'excuses' but once again while we face barriers, the major ones are what we construct ourselves and he concentrates on eliminating these. I like the weird sex transmutation chapter and it's completely hetronormative storyline of evolution which bases his theory on how everyone man is successful because he wants to please a lady - but there is some nuggets of good advice even in this bizarre chapter.

In a nutshell: Crazy book but informative and a time capsule of 1930 American Dream. Worth a read when complimented with modern psychology and good habit forming books.

Nuggets of Good Advice

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-08-2019

This book does do a good job in giving advice and basing on SOME credible avenues for his thinking. I enjoy each of the lessons (even the references to metaphorical bible verses which honestly had good advice) and they all have some meaning each of us can learn from. That being said, there are MANY thoughts or opinions that are personally held and based upon spiritual and religious scripts, rather than factually based. While we can all benefit from some sort of spiritual or moral compass it comes down to finding your own way from wisdom of others and inner reflection rather than basing a lot of opinions on a book written 2000 years ago.

The good parts were good, but the bad parts were BAD. There were at times where I thought, "WOW, that's an INTERESTING opinion... I'll just ignore that advice."
"Girly" boys, women crave men who are more intelligent than themselves and those who protect them, and undermining social reform to help others exit circles of poverty are a few examples of such experiences I had. (and possibly even heavy scepticism on rape victims, but I may have misunderstood his point).

In short, nuggets of wisdom and intelligence... but beware to not blindly obey whatever he suggests as many things are based on his personal experience rather than actual evidence.

Good balance of traditional left and right wing economics ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-07-2018

This book is a great start to understanding economics. It shows you the basics and references books which relate to each chapter and even had a ‘in a nutshell’ idea of each chapter for easy reference.

My criticism would be that some ideas seems to contradict each other in terms of ‘what’s the best plan for x situation’ but I suppose that’s very apt because the book demonstrates that there are multiple ideas from different perspectives of how economics works (and doesn’t). Very interesting and great gateway to actually being interested in economics.

Engaging Read, Some Outdated (and amended) facts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-2018

Great read and fantastic voice performance - really engaging. Since this talks about science it's inevitable that some facts are put of date. Like the number of elements, evolution theories, and that 'glass is a liquid' which caught my attention (it's a myth).

However, the hard copy of this text has amendments and it's still easy to learn and be entertained.

Interesting and Mind Opening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-2018

This book has helped me understand more about human nature and why I find it so hard to understand others and their morals. It helps us understand why people choose some things over others, why many ask ‘how can they believe THAT’S the best way to act!’

While it’s very detailed in the theory and supporting arguments, it does have flaws in my opinion. One of which is that they quantise morals into categories, but fail to establish WHY we should value one more than another. While I understand the use of other moral ‘tastes’ as he put it, I still have trouble understanding why kindness and rationalism shouldn’t be a core concern. There seemed to be a mixed message ‘don’t trust our intuition’ but also ‘don’t base our actions/moral matrix on rational thought.’

Which is it? Should we trust the rider or elephant when making moral matrices?

Perhaps I misunderstood, maybe he meant that our instinctual morals aren’t based on rational thought but ought to be - as he then explained the rational reason for each moral ‘taste’ and it’s benefits.

But overall this book is incredibly helpful in understanding both political extremes on the spectrum and seeing values in your “opponent”. Truly worth the read!