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  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 7
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  • The Road to Character

  • By: David Brooks
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, David Brooks
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

In The Road to Character, David Brooks, best-selling author of The Social Animal and New York Times columnist, explains why selflessness leads to greater success. We all possess two natures. One focuses on external success: wealth, fame, status and a great career. The other aims for internal goodness, driven by a spiritual urge not only to do good but to be good - honest, loving and steadfast. The inner self doesn't seek happiness superficially defined; it seeks emotional commitments without counting the cost and a deeper moral joy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Character explained by impressive examples

  • By Don on 28-01-2019

Character explained by impressive examples

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-2019

If there’s one thing that any generation needs it’s to build strong character in themselves and their children - this book focuses on the former and is told in a compelling way - to give examples of lives well lived but each involving a development of character often from fairly deplorable periods in those lives. I found it fascinating, informative and instructive but not in a direct way but more in a way that prompts the reader or listener to discover for themselves. then character is discussed relating back to these people. Well written, well thought out, well done.

  • The Sun Also Rises

  • By: Ernest Hemingway
  • Narrated by: William Hurt
  • Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 73

The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway's masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the story introduces two of Hemingway's most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. Follow the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of the 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Pretentious nonsense

  • By tone on 26-03-2016

Captivating interpretation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-10-2017

Reading about Hemingway’s striving for minimalistic writing made me think that William Hurt’s voice was the ideal match - he has a slow pace that matches the short, punchy sentences and dialogue. And he colours it all with accents and intonation. His grasp of Mike’s moods and those of the Count are impressive. Well done.

  • Ernest Hemingway

  • A Writer's Life
  • By: Catherine Reef
  • Narrated by: Jill Shellabarger
  • Length: 4 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Meet one of the most significant and notorious American writers of the 20th century. Ernest Hemingway is considered one of the greatest writers in modern history, and his novels and stories are read, studied, and imitated around the world. His concise prose style earned him both a Pulitzer and a Nobel Prize. His name conjures up vivid images: grand adventurer, soldier, war correspondent, big-game hunter, bullfight aficionado, and writer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gives a good understanding of Hemingway

  • By Don on 29-10-2017

Gives a good understanding of Hemingway

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-10-2017

Just what I needed to give background to my reading of a Hemmingway book - without going into too much detail. Thankyou - well written and well read

  • Herbie Hancock: Possibilities

  • By: Herbie Hancock, Lisa Dickey
  • Narrated by: Herbie Hancock
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

Hancock discusses his musical influences, colorful behind-the-scenes stories, his long and happy marriage, and how Buddhism inspires him creatively and personally. Honest, enlightening, and as electrifyingly vital as the man who wrote it, Herbie Hancock promises to be an invaluable contribution to jazz literature and a must-read for fans and music lovers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Herbie's creative process and more

  • By Don on 21-09-2017

Herbie's creative process and more

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-09-2017

Would you consider the audio edition of Herbie Hancock: Possibilities to be better than the print version?

Of course - Herbie narrates it and he is vey entertaining and enthusiastic, right down to the Miles Davis imitations.

Any additional comments?

This is a semi-autobiographical narration by Herbie himself. I listened in half-hour lots in the car and I found it compelling - every 'session' had something interesting. Well done.

  • Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

  • By: Elvis Costello
  • Narrated by: Elvis Costello
  • Length: 17 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 10

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable, audiobook edition of Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink, written and read by Elvis Costello. In a career spanning four decades, Elvis Costello (born Declan MacManus) has made himself a huge reputation through his tunes, lyrics and occasional bad behaviour. Now, for the first time, he is telling his story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully written, smoothly presented.

  • By Don on 18-03-2017

Beautifully written, smoothly presented.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-2017

If you could sum up Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink in three words, what would they be?

immersible emotional enjoyable

What was one of the most memorable moments of Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink?

The poetic jousting with Bob Dylan was an eye-opener. Elvis is very positive throughout the book. I am always inspired by people who can see both sides of a story or situation. Elvis rarely dumps on anyone and if he does, it is veiled - you need to read between the lines to find it. People who are like that are always compelling to listen to - they bring out the best in others. .

What does Elvis Costello bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

It was interesting to have Sean Penn read Dylan's Chronicles because he sounded like a younger Dylan. But Elvis takes it to a much higher level - the author, the musician, the poet doing his own 'readings' - very impressive and very moving at times. Often the demarcation between readings of his lyrics and the prose of the book were hard to spot, such was the power of his writing.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Who has the time? I listened to it in the car and I regret that because I wanted to bookmark so many bits that I'll now buy the book.

Any additional comments?

With a 'Rock&Roll' autobiography you expect a good yarn and little erudition. Dylan gave us a 'masterpiece' but was it really just a good yarn? Elvis gives us both with style and discusses lyrics openly, including acknowledgment of his lyrical and melodic inspirations. He kept notes, he immersed himself in his profession and worked hard and toured extensively. Is this the secret of success? Well, it also helps to have talent - a great voice - which is understated in the book. His rendition of Gloomy Sunday is a case in point. An entertainer, poet, lyricist, composer, writer.....not just a song and dance man.

  • The Story of the Human Body

  • Evolution, Health, and Disease
  • By: Daniel Lieberman
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 14 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 42

In this landmark book of popular science, Daniel E. Lieberman - chair of the department of human evolutionary biology at Harvard University and a leader in the field - gives us a lucid and engaging account of how the human body evolved over millions of years, even as it shows how the increasing disparity between the jumble of adaptations in our Stone Age bodies and advancements in the modern world is occasioning this paradox: greater longevity but increased chronic disease.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book explains a lot!

  • By Don on 22-02-2016

This book explains a lot!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-02-2016

The story of human evolution, the different pathways of different species and how that relates to what we are now is one story in this book and it prepares the reader for what comes next - the q.e.d, the bottom line.
You see the author connects all that with the state of our health today, disease by disease and it is simply fascinating. It follows that if most people understood why we get so many chronic diseases they would be more inclined to act to reduce disease. With healthcare costs becoming unsustainable, people must become more accountable for allowing themselves to succumb to some diseases. This book explains why and that knowledge is, for this humble reader, life changing.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Rest Is Noise

  • Listening to the 20th Century
  • By: Alex Ross
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 23 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

The Rest Is Noise takes the listener inside the labyrinth of modern music, from turn-of-the-century Vienna to downtown New York in the '60s and '70s. We meet the maverick personalities and follow the rise of mass culture on this sweeping tour of 20th-century history through its music.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating- first class audiobook

  • By Don on 17-12-2015

Captivating- first class audiobook

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-12-2015

I come from no knowledge of music history. My reason for choosing this book was to seek a link between my interest in the music of Greenwich village of the 1950-60's and what came before. I thought a writer for the New Yorker would be entertaining and informative and Mr Ross did not let me down. I also chose the audiobook form because I knew I would struggle with the book. Well, it had me captivated for a month in my daily commute to work. It has outlined a far more rich and diverse origin of music than I had imagined. It gave me knowledge of key composers to the present day and it was a good read, albeit sometimes a tough slog. The author's command of language added to the listening experience but I'll need to get the hard copy now because it's impossible to bookmark when driving! I was particularly interested in his documentation of composers "plundering the past" which seems to be a common criticism of more recent songwriters but confirms what people like Pete Seeger have said - that it was the history of music - ideas passed on from one to another. But as well there were new ideas like the atonal, the 12 note music etc of which I knew nothing and now will explore. Well written, well read and well done - thank you