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Omar

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  • 26
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Cultural necessity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-2019

This book is compulsory reading for university admission in the English speaking world, and most conversations in some way relate to it

The Hanbali alternate universe

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-2019

I definitely recommend reading this book, but I recommend thinking about it deeply.
My only complaint is that the narrator really needs to learn how to pronounce people's names.
Otherwise the book is a very interesting travel through the inter madhab rivalries of the 10th century. It isn't supposed to be that, but long irrelevant rivalries are suddenly resurrected in Johnathon Browns head as he brings context and history to problems that only exist if you are trying to maintain a hanbali epistemological world view.
He does a very good job of describing these problems in context, and has done a better job of teaching me the difference between the madhabs than most other people. But I can't help feel that Hanafis and Malikis, who he continually, perhaps unintentionally, refers to as non-sunni, can simply dismiss most if not all the hadith problems he refers to.
This book goes on my recommended reading list.

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-2019

Kenneth W Harl is clearly the best lecturer on audible. All of his courses are fantastic, fascinating and informative. You probably learn double or triple from one of his courses than any other.
The Vikings is no exception. One of the best books I've ever read.

Not what I expected

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-01-2019

I wanted this book to teach me about the 5 religions. Instead it just uses the 5 religions as an example to present a comparative religion framework.... A very broad and obvious framework that isn't useful.

Excellent as usual

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-12-2018

All of Kenneth W Harl's books I've listened to are brilliant, this one included. You can't go wrong with it.

Disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2018

It started off great. And then collapsed.
Most of the book was covering side issues poorly. I still have little idea of Hellenistic history. He covered literature, poetry, religion and other aspects of culture badly. No context, no history, no chronology. Presumable the culture was different between the beginning and end of the age, but you wouldn't know that from the lecture.
Plus he made lots of mistakes. Kept saying Selucia was in Syria. Suggested Hellanism in Afghanistan and Pakistan ended with Bactria ignoring the whole Graeco Buddhist civilisation. He mentioned Parthia twice, in passing, in the last lecture.
I still don't even have an idea of who all the successor states were let alone their history.

Pop science and philosophy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-11-2018

Pretty sure that the majority of this lecture will appear comical and wrong in a hundred years time. It's a mixture of popular science and philosophical speculation, neither of which teach you very much. Nevertheless I did learn the occasional thing and finished the book.

Okay

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-2018

It was good, but a little superficial and quick. Some part of that may be the sources, but some may also be the narrator.

1 person found this helpful

Ancient philosophy rehashed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-2018

A mixture of epicurean hedonism combined with medieval asceticism wrapped up in modern Australian financial advice.
Interesting, but I doubt the author is truly barefoot.

  • Asabiyyah
  • What Ibn Khaldun, the Islamic Father of Social Science, Can Teach Us About the World Today
  • By: Ed West
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan

Post this to every politician

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-2018

Simply fascinating. I've bought Ibn Khalduns book because of this. Five random extra words too