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  • 7
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  • 62
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The Golden Age

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-02-2021

E. Nesbit's books are a part of the golden age of children's literature. Elegant, simple writing. Meaningful stories that touch in some way the notion of the Fable.

Wodehouse at his best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-2021

Psmith is *the* Wodehousian character. He is like a primeval fusion of all the favourites combining the wit of Galahad, the finesse of Jeeves, the good nature of Wooster, the popeyed cunning of Ukridge and the quixotic taste of Uncle Fred.

There is no voice actor who could convey Psmitb like Cecil. The man is a genius.

Dumas' characters are excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-2020

Dumas' portraits of the wiley and profligate D'Artagnan and the avaricious and crafty Mazarin are such a delight. The 3 Musketeers themselves are the harmony, the sophisticated Aramis a fascinating and hilarious contrast to both the open nobility of Athos and the grandiloquent buffoonery of Porthos.

Dumas is a genius and you must get this book and this version.
To the reviewers who dislike Davidson - you are barbarians.

Discover Luther and enjoy it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-12-2019

This is not hagiography (a relief). This is a great biography.
Metaxas overcooks it slightly at the very beginning, but don't let that put you off. He settles to approachable language very quickly, which when coupled with his own quixotic humour makes for a great listen.
I'm not sure if this is a rule of good biography, but I walked away with a powerful sense of Metaxas' sympathy for Luther. And this seems a necessary ingredient to understanding the remarkable Luther.

You like the podcasts but will you like the book?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-2019

I have long enjoyed Klavan's podcasts. While interested enough to wish I had read this book, I wasn't sure if I could go through with actually shelving other books and spending the time to listen.

Well, I have listened. And I'm glad I took the time.

Often, and at startling points, I found myself relating to this digital mentor's openness, even vulnerability as he opened his life experience to us.

Though I don't have the same life experiences, I can relate to your the internal world. And in it's way it has changed me.

Thank you Andrew.

I came to test Gramsci

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-2019

I have loved Sherlock Holmes since devouring Simon Vance's narration of the Complete Works; and came across The Innocence of Father Brown as an avid follower of Frederick Davidson's narration.
Before deciding to buy it, I read a quote where Gramsci compares the mediocrity of Conan-Doyle and the genius of Chesterton. Having tested his surprising claim, I am afraid to report that old Italian Marxist was right. Chesterton is a genius. And while I love Cona-Doyle, he is a clumsy imitation.
Free tip: I have heard people complain about Davidson and wish that John Lee would narrate the books instead. They are Philistines.

I gave it back after 3hrs listening

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-03-2019

Follett likes to create a mediaeval setting and then superimpose modern characters, sensibilities and soap opera morals on top. It's frankly repulsive.

He also had a grotesque and imbecilic view of mediaeval religion, summarily dismissed in "because God says so". This is a pantomime of understanding that suggests the author doesn't really know his subject or how to convey it to a modern reader.

John Lee as narrator? It's okay.

It's a Classic for a Reason

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-09-2018

I follow Frederick Davidson to wherever he narrates. He had a unique gift.
Les Miserables is a tapestry of Justice and Mercy, for which I haven't seen a parallel outside Scripture.
Beware, French Literature pivots on the poignancy of death. Dry eyes only for cold hearts or unimaginative ones.

1 person found this helpful

I've finally gotten into this series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-04-2018

Lawhead's best stuff imo is his Pendragon cycle. This is an interesting series that is now becoming fascinating.

A masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-2017

Frederick Davidson is the only reader worthy of such a classic. I am ashamed that I had not "read" this book until now.