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21st C How To Make Friends & Influence People

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-2020

This book is an important listen for everyone and In my opinion, it is the 21st Century version of "How to Make Friends and Influence People".
Its a life companion on personal relationships and how to succeed. I am older and in senior management and I found this book important and am grateful for its existence.
Leil and Joyce's narration is exemplary.
This is a companion book to be read and reread and used as a reference guide in navigating the human world.



Entertaining and a delight to listen to.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-2020

Almost a 21st century inverse of a Fortunate Life. Funny, humourous, witty, and emotional, a chuckle. You will think differently about your life. Its almost a "Gay Green Acres". They do everything wrong but still with hard work come out on top.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I commiserate with Todd and Jeff. But having lived on a farm, A dead Kangaroo in a dam can cause Botulism and kill stock not to mention people.

I actually looked up Block 8 and did a google search on the property. Interesting. A little conservation work and they have a great farm....and a case of Shiraz may be on order.
Worth the read. Worth the laugh
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I found myself Researching The Sydney Cove

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-2020

Alison Huber put it best:
Preservation is a skilful and, most importantly, very entertaining work of imagination, full of tension and menace, that keeps the reader sweating over what will become of the protagonists until the very end. A more odious villain than the imposter tea merchant, Figge, could hardly be imagined: he and another unreliable survivor hinder attempts by officials in Sydney to understand exactly what happened. Serong uses all his crime-writing tricks of the trade in this literary novel, and it’s hugely effective. This is the kind of historical fiction writing that makes the reader wonder where the ‘real’ past ends and invention begins
Alison Huber, Head Buyer at Readings

Expected More Juice but Well Worth the Listen.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-2020

Young Mary really has it in for her grandfather and so she should Fred was a dysfunctional sociopath criminal with no redeeming virtues. He happily passed these traits onto Donald and the rest of the family. Enabling them to ignore the law and commit atrocities that most would serve time for. Mary expanded on themes already known but with a family twist that highlighted why Donald is a Naristic Sociopath with a massive inferiority complex. Who is co-dependant as he never had a loving relationship with either of his parents.
Too Much and Never Enough, How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man
combined with The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir By John Bolton
and A Warning By Anonymous ......will give you an insight into an extremely damaged person who is unsuited to be in business let alone run a "once-great" country.
A must-listen for those who need to understand idiot boy. It almost (and I mean almost) made me sad for Donald. Then I read the news. NO..................
Read and vote.

1 person found this helpful

Post Apocalyptic Masterpiece.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-2020

Short and distinct, Cormac is the master of description and puts you in the mood of the characters.
Tom Stechschulte is a brilliant choice for this novel and made it an American epic. I am glad I watched the movie first as it gave my imagination the resources to fully flesh out the narration.
Highly involving and well worth reading.

Worthy of the Ned Kelly Award

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-05-2020

A great listen, very Australian and engrossing.
I read (Listened) to Quota fresh from reading The Rules of Backyard Cricket. I enjoyed both immensely.
Characters were well developed and authentic.
BUT: The opening is a little incorrect. If a Judge went on the way the Judge did in the book. It would be grounds for a miss trial.

Other than that Quota is a very enjoyable book, open to a sequel and I look forward to the next Jock Serong Book.
Simon Harvey is a good narrator and gave the book its authenticity.

Recommended

Conflicted But Apt Conclusion To the Hunger Games

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-2020

Worth reading, The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes is conflicted and twisted.
Who is Snow..............

I think it could have lead to a new series but was cut short at the end.

I Don't want to ruin it but if you love the Hunger Games you need to listen to The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes
Santino was good and like others, the songs could have been sung But perhaps this was done on purpose.

There is actually a song called the hanging tree, worth listening to.......
I will miss this series and imagine what became of Lucy.........................series extension, you tell me.
Recommended.

Made Cricket Interesting. Gritty and Real.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-05-2020

I have no idea about Cricket and this book enthralled me. Loveable rogue. Interesting description of a game I liken to grass growing. A brilliant twist at the end although .........an Australian Captain???? no

I enjoyed listening to this book thoroughly. Well researched and a very vivid believable description of the criminal element similar to that I have seen in horse racing circles. The drug scenarios were again realistic and well thought out.

In all a story of a loveable rogue that captures the imagination.

Gritty real,
Worth reading

Inspirational But Snap and Crackle

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-04-2020

Having read the publishers summary, I thought this would be a Harvard Business Review or London School of Economics level of young Roberts career and the unparalleled success this man has earned and enjoyed. I regret it was more snap and crackle.

In the first chapter, read by Robert, I wanted to call in Jimmy Cricket, Walt's fixer as Robert needed Disney motivation.
In essence, this is a good book, a light enjoyable inspirational book about a man who would have made Walt proud. I have studied the Pixar/Disney business models and history and smile, about some parts.....

If you like me, wanted a more in-depth explanation of Robert's exemplative life, the postscript or appendix is the primary reason to buy this book. I kind of pray, Robert would consider taking a chair at Harvard or London School and teach his genius.

I would highly recommend also reading To Pixar and Beyond, By Lawrence Levy as this explains a lot more about the Pixar / Disney relationship and opens up about Robert's real success, taking Disney from complacency to the industry dominate powerhouse it is today.

I highly recommend reading but hope there will be a more in-depth HBR book to follow young Robert.

Inspirational.....

A Must to Finalise The Persimmon Tree

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-04-2020

I loved the Persimmon Tree and Fishing for Stars is the finalization that was needed to close the story. but
Some of the promises of Characters in the Persimmon Tree dwindled and became tangential. Marge offered so much promise in character development in TPT but was lost in FFS as I regret young Bryce's political Dilemma took over. I actually fast forward over the Tasmanian experience as it became tedious. The editor in the rewrite should have cut this dramatically. Kevin's character developed and allowed him to fit and contribute to the book.

A must-read if you read the Persimmon Tree.....

A more minor point is that some of the Japanese references were actually Chinese.
The final chapter makes it worth buying the book.

Well worth the read if you read The Persimmon Tree first.