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Was a struggle

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-2020

I struggled to get into this, not bad, but didn't enjoy part 1 or part 3.

Very enjoyable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-2020

I did enjoy this, I enjoyed reading about how Billy Jensen developed his method. I didn't really know what to expect when going into this. I enjoyed the tone, and the overall message. I hope that Billy is successful in his quest to solve crimes.

Not the book for me , could work for someone else

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-2020

If I had have researched this book, I never would have read it. It really was not what I was looking for in a Green River Killer book. Time taken to read/ listen: 16 Days I listened to this as an audiobook on Audible, and it is really not what I was looking for from a true crime book. This book is split into several five parts. The first four sections of this book broke down the investigation into the Green River Killer based on who was in charge of the investigation; Book 1: Kraske (1982-83), Book 2: Adamson (1984-86), Book 3: Pompey (1986-87), and Book 4: Evans (1988-90). The last section of this book is an epilogue that was written several years after the book was originally published which looked at Gary Ridgeway's capture and prosecution. My issue with the book, which is completely my own fault because I didn't do enough research before reading this one, was that it was originally published before Gary Ridgeway was even caught. The only mention of the actual killer was the epilogue. This book goes into very rich detail about the minute details of the investigation but you don't really get a sense of the killer.

1 person found this helpful

I enjoyed the narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-2020

I found this book while perusing Audible looking for my next non-fiction read. This jumped out to me as I do enjoy true crime as a genre. I can honestly say that I had never heard of Israel Keyes before reading/listening to this book. I can't believe that I had never heard of this serial killer. The title of the book says that Israel Keyes was the "most meticulous serial killer of the 21st century", but was he really or did he just have a streak of luck? To be meticulous you are "showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise", and while this in some ways sounds like Israel Keyes, I think it also fails to consider the fact that Keyes was a sporadic killer who killed at random and when he felt the desire. When you think about why Keyes got caught, you have to think, is that really the behaviour of a meticulous person? I think this book is well research and informative. I like the structure of the novel- how part 1 focused on the disappear of Samantha Koenig and the subsequent parts focus on the apprehension and investigation into Keyes. I like how the reader really gets you invested into the characters involved in Samantha's life, so that when you finally read about her body being discovered your heart breaks.

A very unbalanced account...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-2020

**3 stars** This was a difficult one for me to rate. David Thibodeau is a survivor of the Waco disaster when 70+ people died in a seige lasting more than a month. This is his (very bias) story of what happened and how he came to join the Branch Davidian cult. I am personally glad that I read this account before reading an account written by on of the law enforcement officers. Thibodeau writes very articulately and delves into the experience, but I feel like this book was an attempt to lay pure blame at the hands of the American Federal Government and he does not seek to take any of the responsibility for what happened. David Thibodeau had an experience. It was unique and unlike any other. It was his experience and his life for more than two years. However, his perspective is skewed. It seems to me that Thibodeau has spent many years trying to come to terms with what happened but still cannot remove himself from the situation enough to see that many of the people at Mount Carmel were to blame for what happened on April 19th 1993 and in the ensuring days. What bothers me is that even some 25 years later (I read the revised version), Thibodeau is still unable to come to terms with the fact that David Koresh was not a good person. He was a criminal, and just because he claimed to be a prophet and spoke the word of good does not undo the horrible things he did. Thibodeau was constantly making excuses for Koresh and completely glossed over the fact that Koresh was a rapist. Koresh willing engaged in sex with girls as young as 12 years old. That is criminal and disgusting. In a closed community, where a man is held up on a pedestal, how can I young girl give informed consent to have sex? She cannot. Thibodeau never condemns this behaviour by Koresh, and in-fact tries to justify it to himself and accuses one girl of being a liar. Infact, if we really want to get down to the nitty gritty, Thibodeau actually aided Koresh in his rape of young girls by agreeing to marry Michelle- this was a clear attempt to get the authorities to stop looking closely at Michelle and who the father of her three children where. He admitted that the marriage was a sham, therefore, he clearly understood the reasons for his marriage. It was done in order to allow Koresh to keep having sex with Michelle without the authorities getting involved. Thibodeau does present a few valid points about the siege. The government did a horrific job of addressing the situation. It was badly mishandled, and the government should have taken a good hard long look at their procedures after this event. Most of the victims of the Waco tradgedy were innocent and did not deserve to die- especially in the horrific and terrifying manner that they experienced. The excessive violence and cruel siege tactics that of the ATF was out of line, especially with so many children on the premise. The media was also a bit hasty to condemn the entire compound without really acknowledging that they too were victims of cruelty. Overall, I look forward to reading more balanced accounts of the siege. My heart goes out to Thibodeau over his experiences, he was , after all is said and done- another victim of David Koresh.

1 person found this helpful

A very informative read!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-03-2020

Let me preface this by saving, I added this to my TBR back in 2012 after rewatching the film Defiance which was based on this book. I loved the film, and I think that I had somehow expected the book to be like the film, where it follows mainly the lives of the brother, this was not the case. This is a novel that explores the stories of the Bielski Partisans, particularly, how they came to join the otriad. As previously mentioned, this is not what I had expected. I had expected a story that was more about the Bielski brothers and not so much about the other partisans. However, when I started getting into the book, it makes sense why it was not done this way. Firstly, the author was only able to interview Tuvia Bielski for approximately two hours before he passed away. Therefore, most of her interviews came from the wives of the brothers and surviving partisans. The stories of the partisans are very moving and insightful. It is incredibly moving to hear their stories of strength, bravery, courage and sacrifice. It is also amazing to see how over 1,000 people were able to create an almost fully sustainable community in the middle of the forest. Furthermore, another interesting element of this book was reading about the Soviet Otriads and reading about their interesting makeup.

So comprehensive!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-2020

If you are looking for a comprehensive overview of the rise and fall of both Hitler and the Third Reich, this could be for you! Beware, it is super long !!!

This was not what I was looking for

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-12-2019

** 2 stars** This was not what I was looking for in an Ivan Milat True Crime book Time taken to read/ listen: 10 Days I listened to this as an audiobook on Audible, and it is really not what I was looking for from a true crime book. This book is split into two Parts. Part 1 looks into the police investigation into the Back Packer Murders and Taskforce Air, who were responsible for bringing Ivan Milat to trial. Part 2 looks at the different police techniques that were "discovered" during the investigation and how these have been used to solve various different cold cases. This read like a bunch of police documents that go through procedure, they do not analyse the case or attempt to understand Milat or his background. Not the book for me but could work for someone else

An insightful audiobook

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-2019

**3 stars** An insightful audiobook, however, I did occasionally zone out. In 1990, three Indigenous Australian children were murdered in the small New South Wales town of Bowraville. The same man has been tied to all three murders, however, almost thirty years later noone has ever been convicted of the murders. This is the is the story told by journalist Dan Box, about the families' fight for justice of the three children. Dan Box has clearly invested himself in the investigation of these children. He, attempts to give readers an unbiased account of the investigation into the deaths of the children however, he begins to realise that by telling the story of these children he has become part of the story. It is an interesting concept, how can reporters remain unbiased when they have clear beliefs and values? This book could be difficult to read, it touches on some very difficult themes such as murder, rape, domestic violence, alcohol abuse, racism and suicide. Dan Box raises some interesting questions when telling these stories. He questions about the inherent racism of the NSW police when investigating this crime, the negligence of police officers in the first case, and really makes you question how it came to be that these children where murdered, and the police force did very little to investigate or support the investigation. I think the best part of this book is reading about the plight of the families and their quest for justice. The children's' families fought for two decades for justice. The fought so hard that they managed to change NSW law and get the Double Jeopardy law rewritten. My heart really goes out to these families who really just wanted justice and answers. Overall, quite a good read

A truely comprehensive look into Jim Jones

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2019

**4 stars** A truely comprehensive look into Jim Jones and Jonestown. This is the first audiobook that I have ever listened too and I think it was a great introduction. Guinn has written a detailed, unbiased account of Jim Jones' life and the rise and fall of the Peoples Temple. I truely found this novel fascinating and I enjoyed reading about all of the different people that were associated with the Peoples Temple and Jonestown. Would highly recommend if you want learn about this particular part of history. I am looking forward to eventually reading Jeff Guinn's Manson.