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Kirsty

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Another Rebus Masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-2020

Two intertwined stories bring Rebus, Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox back into our lives, not to mentiom Big Ger and Christine Essen. Rebus is in better health than during his last two or three outings which is wonderful. The plots are engrossing - well, of course they are, and the team of Rankin and Macpherson bring the various characters to life admirably.

2 people found this helpful

OK story, great narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-09-2020

Bought this on impulse as the daily deal and not having read others. The writing is good, the plot less so. Guessed the ending a long way back. It is obvious too that the author likes some of the characters he has created and really, really dislikes others - not sure it helps the narrative.

Christmas Menu Sorted for Many Years To Come

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-2020

The musings and insights are mostly heartwarming, though lovers of purple baubles, affordable scented candles and mulled wine might not appreciate some of the comments. These aside, this is a cosy soft blanket of a book and one I listen to in and out of season. The download of recipes is first class.

Not very interesting or exciting

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-2020

A very ho-hum Grisham - passed a few iso hours but there is no excitement, the denoument is wishy-washy and the characterisation is poor. Basically a few thousand words which meander along aimlessly after Chapter One which had some promise. Adequate narration. Glad it was a daily specialy and I didn't pay full price.

What a well balanced person

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-2020

Despite being born into one of the families whose name and privilege is known in this country, the author is very honest about how life in the last half century was not as easy for him as those on the outside looking in would think it is. His has not been the scramble for the next meal or where to sleep each night, but to wrestle with the problems of how to find meaning in his life, not in a hand wringing, poor me way, but to get back to an understanding a slower way of life, a connectedness with individuals, to eschew the more rampant consumerism ratrace, and to be the best father and companion any human can try to be. He comes across as the kind of person who would really focus on you while you are with him if you were to meet, and are also making the effort to change for good, as opposed to being a sycophant because of his name or background. The book is thoughtful, generous in sharing, and ultimately a reflection on a very varied life where lessons have often had to be painfully learned, but which have all made him the man he is today, a man who at last seems to be very comfortable in his skin.

Not for the squeamish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-2020

I won't finish this book about unpleasant people doing unpleasant things to each other very nastily.

34 people found this helpful

A great disappointment

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-12-2019

I found the writer opinionated to the degree that it just became unlistenable - what came across to me was that her views are the only valid ones. When she was giving straight history the narrative was OK, but soon she was off with her opinion, and rarely, if ever, did she quote from a person with a dissenting view. The reader's performance was great.

1 person found this helpful

It's a Cracking Yarn

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-10-2019

Despite making his views known about Brexit and the current leaders of superpowers, this is a much more benign John Le Carre than in many of his other works. He seems to actually like his main characters and makes us really feel for them, and enjoy their journey as the story grows, rather than pitying them. I have read in some newspaper reviews that Ed really annoys people, but I know some Eds and he is drawn realistically but sympathetically for the most. The work feels slighter than others but despite the state of the nation, the story around the characters and where they end up was pretty positive, unlike in quite a few of his other works. As to the reading, while being a complete fan of Michael Jayston, yes, he is younger than the author at 83 but this is the second he hasn't narrated so perhaps he is no longer available. To start with I was concerned that maybe Mr Le Carre has emphysema or similar as he did seem breathless, but either I got used to it, or it lessened. Loved the book and have listened to it three times already.

2 people found this helpful

Evocative of the Outback Landscape and Its People

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-10-2019

Well, I think it is, as I haven't been in western Queensland, but this is a great story. The landscape, as seen through European-Australian eyes (I did not get the sense there are any characters who are Indigenous), often seems to be the main character, the humans secondary. The search for the actual lost man is like peeling an onion: who he is at the beginning of the book is very different from the person we have got to know by the end. In fact, that goes for most of the people. It's as if their characteristics change as more of their story is revealed, but the landscape doesn't.

I Love Paris!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-2019

I found out things I didn't know and relived memories of visits past. But the narration almost sent me to sleep, delivered without animation, and in flat tones. So jarring and really detracted from the text.