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M. O'Brien

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  • 10
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  • 42
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Insightful

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-07-2020

I'm not into politics at all but rather love a good biography. I could have stopped once he became prime minister as I'm more engaged by what in a person's history inspires p & drives them, however I ploughed on. It is a long book, perhaps too long for me but it did give me insight into the back rooms of parliament, the wheeling & dealing of Australian politics and the lies. Nothing we didn't already know about our politicians but at least Turnbull had the intelligence, worldly experience and love for this country to really make a difference during his short term.

Perfect for a long road trip!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-2020

I had read the negative reviews some time ago but came back to this book and decided to read it anyway. Living in Australia I'm mostly naive to the Mexican immigrant stories but I'm glad the controversary didn't put me off. It's a story, it is clearly fiction and I enjoyed listening to it as an audiobook on a recent ten-hour road trip. It was riveting from the very start and for me if anything it highlighted Mexico and its stories and I will more than likely now seek out others, so surely that's a positive?

Compulsory read for all Aussies

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-2020

Not what you'd call an enjoyable read but sadly it was very enlightening. This book highlights the ignorance of white Australia. It sheds much light on the traditional owners of our great land and it should be a compulsory read for every student.

Cannot wait to watch this as a TV Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-04-2020

I really enjoyed this nostalgic visit to the mucic industry of my childhood. I particularly liked the central strong female character of Daisy who takes us on a pretty wild ride.

A story of perseverance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-2020

I love almost all autobiographies but I knew nothing about Bruce Springsteen, I have never been a fan but this book was so highly rated I thought I'd give it a go. Look it was interesting, particularly his reflections on his life growing up but it just didn't interest me. His resilience & grit are certainly to be admired and he deserves every bit of his success.

Not very substantial

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-2020

Was honestly thinking it was just getting going & instead it finished. It was a super quick, easy read but quite a simplistic storyline.

Talk about how the other half live!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-01-2020

Incredible insight into the life of a British aristocrat. An extraordinary story that certainly confirms that money does not equate to happiness. I normally prefer biographies that leave me inspired and this did not deliver in that respect but was a good light Summer read that reconfirmed my thinking about Australia's place in the commonwealth and the extreme eccentricities of the aristocratic upper class!

Blessed be Margaret Atwood!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-2019

Incredibly good considering the 30+ years in between writing The Handmaid's Tale & The Testaments. Having watched the series also helped build a stronger understanding of the characters and I loved that the hero of this book is the least likely character from the Handmaid's Tale. I also enjoyed the underlying theme of 'hope' throughout the book.

Had me at the 1st line

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-2019

Warlight had me at the first line "In 1945 our parents went away and left us in the care of two men who may have been criminals." Warlight was a bit like sitting through a 3hr epic movie where you get a vague idea of what's going on through the lens of a childs memory. Then the second half the child is an adult and as he discovers more about his past so does the reader. I can't say I loved it, it was a slow and steady burn that given the first line I thought might be far more thrilling than it was.

A laborious read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-09-2019



Whilst it wasn't hard to read it was a bit laborious. I actually enjoyed the no name conventions the author employed and thought it was quite clever, but overall it was very slow going and jumped aorund quite a bit. I found it interesting from a historical perspective, set in Northern Ireland during the "troubles" and just recognsing the fear, the suspicion and distrust (even of hosiptals) that invades a persons psyche. I began thinking about it through generations (for the Irish a distrust of authority, in Australian Hostory the distrust of the Police is one example, or even in currrent times our local Jewsih schools and public places all have armed security guards as years after the war the distrust and fear is still strong and has become a way of life) The fact that noone would use a telephone withough checking for bugs first...what an awful way to live. So I supose I was moreinterested in the books Irishness and to see how I'd find a book where no place, or person, is ever named.