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  • How Not to Be a Boy

  • By: Robert Webb
  • Narrated by: Robert Webb
  • Length: 8 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 366
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340

Looking back over his life, from schoolboy crushes (on girls and boys) to discovering the power of making people laugh (in the Cambridge Footlights with David Mitchell), and from losing his beloved mother to becoming a husband and father, Robert Webb considers the absurd expectations boys and men have thrust upon them at every stage of life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5/5

  • By Anonymous User on 29-11-2017

One of the best autobiographies I've ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-2018

Robert's incredible candor and insight into his youth and the problems caused by his masculine environment are a real relief to many men who either have already identified these issues or will grapple with them some day. His hilarious and witty presentation doesn't romanticise his young self too much and he is very ready to criticise his failings, even now as a feminist still falling into the traps of his conditioned youth. The stories and imaginings are fun and boyish whilst also challenging the very nature of what being a boy means or should mean. Robert's recording was also riddled with fun asides and extras which make the audiobook feel just that bit special and not guilty about not finding the time to read the hardback. Beautiful book from a beautiful artist.

  • Hitch-22

  • A Memoir
  • By: Christopher Hitchens
  • Narrated by: Christopher Hitchens
  • Length: 17 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 125
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 127

In this long-awaited and candid memoir, Hitchens re-traces the footsteps of his life to date, from his childhood in Portsmouth, with his adoring, tragic mother and reserved Naval officer father; to his life in Washington DC, the base from which from he would launch fierce attacks on tyranny of all kinds. Along the way, he recalls the girls, boys and booze; the friendships and the feuds; the grand struggles and lost causes; and the mistakes and misgivings that have characterised his life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tour De Force but rebalance your speakers

  • By W. Stokeley on 27-02-2018

Hitchens has immortalised yet humanised himself

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-07-2018

Hitchens' voice alone is astounding, however it is his skill with not only presenting words, but arranging, decorating and using them to exact so perfectly the effect he wants his audience to have. At times his sincerity and ironic consciousness to not be self-conscious really create the honest image of this man who recognises the pages soon closing on him. His commentary on Cold War politics (the most influential period of his life), can be both alienating and inspiring for a young audience who should ensure they then go out and learn more about this era.

His playful insistence to see and make poetry at all opportunities is iconic and cements his reputation. The mixture of cheer and shame and embarassment as he unlocks once repressed memories of his youth shows Hitch's humanity and susceptibility to their upbringing, yet also show his admirable ability to reflect with humour and scrutiny.

Hitch 22 is not his whole legacy, however is a strong testament to who he is and how he formed such a bold persona over his very full years above this earth. He assures me that hedonism and the pursuit of love, knowledge and goodness cannot ever be underrated, regardless of how many years you may or may not have on your card.

  • The Golden Age

  • By: Joan London
  • Narrated by: Daniel Koek
  • Length: 5 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 52

Perth, 1954. Thirteen-year-old Frank, a refugee from wartime Hungary, is learning to walk again after contracting polio. At The Golden Age Children's Convalescent Home, he meets Elsa, and the two patients form a forbidden, passionate bond. The Golden Age becomes the little world that reflects the larger one, where everything occurs: love, desire, music, death and poetry.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Possibly a good book, poorly narrated

  • By Alison on 19-06-2019

A beautiful ensemble

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-2018

The Golden Age is a beautifully told story of intersecting lives and cultures at a children's Polio Hospital in Perth. Revolving heavily around the young New Australian, Frank, the narrative provides a warm and diverse look into all of the different patients and families at the home. Most captivating are the glimpses of Ida and Meyer's experiences from their escape of both the Nazi occupation in Hungary, and the ensuing 'liberation' by the Red Army. London beautifully voices the fragile tension between memory and imagination as the Gold's try to make a new life in Australia, yet never allowing themselves to become complacent - "we Jews have to be on the lookout"

  • Tracks

  • A Woman's Solo Trek across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback
  • By: Robyn Davidson
  • Narrated by: Angie Milliken
  • Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 170
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171

Enduring sweltering heat, fending off poisonous snakes and lecherous men, chasing her camels when they get skittish and nursing them when they are injured, Davidson emerges as an extraordinarily courageous heroine driven by a love of Australia's landscape, an empathy for its indigenous people, and a willingness to cast away the trappings of her former identity. Tracks is the compelling, candid story of her odyssey of discovery and transformation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I found a gem

  • By FritzRadda on 07-03-2018

An extraordinary journey of the spirit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-2017

Tracks illustrates the beauty and spirit of country, and the harsh, greyed hand of colonialism.