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One of the best autobiographies I've ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-2018

Robert's incredible candor and insight into his youth and the problems caused by his masculine environment are a real relief to many men who either have already identified these issues or will grapple with them some day. His hilarious and witty presentation doesn't romanticise his young self too much and he is very ready to criticise his failings, even now as a feminist still falling into the traps of his conditioned youth. The stories and imaginings are fun and boyish whilst also challenging the very nature of what being a boy means or should mean. Robert's recording was also riddled with fun asides and extras which make the audiobook feel just that bit special and not guilty about not finding the time to read the hardback. Beautiful book from a beautiful artist.

Hitchens has immortalised yet humanised himself

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-07-2018

Hitchens' voice alone is astounding, however it is his skill with not only presenting words, but arranging, decorating and using them to exact so perfectly the effect he wants his audience to have. At times his sincerity and ironic consciousness to not be self-conscious really create the honest image of this man who recognises the pages soon closing on him. His commentary on Cold War politics (the most influential period of his life), can be both alienating and inspiring for a young audience who should ensure they then go out and learn more about this era. His playful insistence to see and make poetry at all opportunities is iconic and cements his reputation. The mixture of cheer and shame and embarassment as he unlocks once repressed memories of his youth shows Hitch's humanity and susceptibility to their upbringing, yet also show his admirable ability to reflect with humour and scrutiny. Hitch 22 is not his whole legacy, however is a strong testament to who he is and how he formed such a bold persona over his very full years above this earth. He assures me that hedonism and the pursuit of love, knowledge and goodness cannot ever be underrated, regardless of how many years you may or may not have on your card.

A beautiful ensemble

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-2018

The Golden Age is a beautifully told story of intersecting lives and cultures at a children's Polio Hospital in Perth. Revolving heavily around the young New Australian, Frank, the narrative provides a warm and diverse look into all of the different patients and families at the home. Most captivating are the glimpses of Ida and Meyer's experiences from their escape of both the Nazi occupation in Hungary, and the ensuing 'liberation' by the Red Army. London beautifully voices the fragile tension between memory and imagination as the Gold's try to make a new life in Australia, yet never allowing themselves to become complacent - "we Jews have to be on the lookout"

An extraordinary journey of the spirit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-2017

Tracks illustrates the beauty and spirit of country, and the harsh, greyed hand of colonialism.