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Amanda

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A series of events won by Deus ex machina

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-2019

Whilst well written, the story is punctuated by more than just a few close calls rescued by Deus ex machina, but the worst is the final battle.
A few minutes of Salt spray exposure on a beach should not rapidly affect the integrity of a composite bow. That is just a cheap exit clause the author came up with to protect his protagonists against overwhelming odds.
If this is the norm in his books, I do think think i'll be buying any more.
I hate giving bad reviews, because of the hard work out into a production like this. Make up your own mind.

Intriguing concepts, but delivered with a gripe...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-11-2019

Hancock has had his detractors over the years, as with anyone who openly defies convention.
With his take on the broader influence of an advanced, yet lost civilisation being difficult to challenge, his open and repeated hostility against established archeological paradigms seems to mire this book down into a personal vendetta .His frequent barb's at the conventional "Clovis First" camp of thought seems excessive, giving the overall feel more of a long personal opinion piece rather than an expiration of newer schools of thought.
Recent archeological discoveries in Mexico, however, seem to vindicate his view that the first people of the Americas were present faronger than originally thought.
If you enjoy Hancock and the ideas he expresses, but unconcerned by the way he delivers them, then by all means buy this book.
If you don't care for the enmity that comes through against the archeological community's challenges to those same ideas, then give it a miss.

More Ben Kane storytelling brilliance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-2019

In the current and developing understanding of tolerance, acceptance and limited conflict around the world, it a bit of a task to sympathise with the Roman protagonist, Tullus. His actions at the German village and the overall themes of the all conquering Roman military machine make it difficult to accept the actions of soldiers on the Roman side as heroic. War is ghastly, no matter what the time period. Kane writes about it in the grittiest, fast paced way we know and appreciate.
I enjoyed it, as a piece that transports me back to a time in history that holds me in fascination.
Thoroughly recommended for historical fiction fans and anyone with an interest in classical antiquity.

Byzantium uncovered

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-09-2018

If only just recently been intrigued by ancient history and even more recent been beguiled by Eastern Roman Empire. I’d read about the transition of Rome from republic to empire, it’s troubles, decline into chaos and fading away, but had stopped short of expanding on my understanding of what Eastern Roman Empire was about. Richard Fidler has kindled that interest anew. Having enjoyed the comedy of the Doug Anthony Allstars in the 90s, and catching the odd episode of Conversations on Radio National, I was really intrigued that he’d written this piece on Byzantium. I loved it!
However, one pitifully sampled detain had got to me. As a toxophilite myself, I openly (and I mean cursing at my phone) chastised the author on referencing the Hunnic use of the compound bow. I use a compound bow. The Hun used composite bows. Big difference. Apart from that ever so slight editorial gaff, I thoroughly recommend this book who is even remotely curious about Byzantium.

Content - Yes, Narration - Not so much...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-06-2018

While I haven't the heart to finish this book, from what I've heard so far, there are some gems in this book.
I can't bring myself to finish the book, however, simply because the narration is so bad.
I hate being critical when so much work has gone into producing something as technical as an audiobook, but the narrator sounds drunk, or a character from McHales Navy (if the later is more appropriate, then typecasting success story here, given the subject matter).
If you are a hardcore military aviation fan, then by all mean knock yourself out. Lots of great anecdotes included.

I want to believe. I really do...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-2018

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

There's a whole under current of credibility to the UFO well spring of info, it's a real task to filter out the misinformation. Greer even acknowledges this in the book. However I came away feeling a tad more skeptical of it when attempts to detail the technology of ETV's. Yes, time well spent listening to it, if only to look into the subject more

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

Most interesting aspect was the first hand accounts from credible and respected sources. A very powerful card to play in a deck full of jokers, however my skeptical mind has me thinking some of these maybe willing (and maybe unwilling) participants in the misinformation mechanism.
The least interesting is the tedious explanation of the "anti gravitic drive" technology, in terms of high voltage and magnetic flux. I mean, come on!
Oh, and the Atacama humanoid. It has to be human. You can't keep passing off weird nature as supernatural.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Not applicable.

Did Unacknowledged inspire you to do anything?

Yes, to read further into the Sirius Disclosure group

Any additional comments?

If you are open minded to the possibility of ET contact within our lifetime and the pursuit of outing the people behind the global conspiracy, then give it a go. If you are a total skeptic, also give it a go. See if it reinforces your views.

1 person found this helpful

Eye opening until...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-11-2017

Spencer quotes Geert Wilders, then a level incredulity can be forgiven. It would be like using Pauline Hanson to prop up the same arguments. Context is everything, of course, and this is mentioned in the book, but I’m sure that while the authors’ research is extensive, there is bound to be a level of cherry picking used to dismantle the “apologists” self same level of selective quotation to support the holy book. Have a listen with an open mind and make your own decision.

1 person found this helpful

Gripping stuff

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-2016

I don't normally do this genre of book, but the supernatural themes seem to beckon. The authors' crafting of the scenery and characters in vivid detail and the dialogue turn of phrase, whilst very course at times, being me from edge do your seat to out loud chuckle, all in the space of a minute or so. If you don't mind raw bloody violence and salty language, give it a go.

1 person found this helpful

Imaginative tie-in to historical events

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-2016

Really interesting way of bringing to life the Roman experience in the time of the First Triumvirate.
I do question the need, however, to detail rape scenes. Inference and emotional outcomes would be more appropriate.
Michael Praed delivers a wide range of characterisations, it's hard to believe it's the same narrator.

Otherwise, a great continuation of the story of the twins.

A story spoken with great enthusiasm...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-2015

Everything a gripping war story should be.
But the main protagonist (Marcus) sounds a tad effeminate. Very engrossing story telling.