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David Burne

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Histrionic performance exposes a rather cliched story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-2019

My word, how I hated the narrator, Lani Tupu. Histrionically exaggerated expression turned every sentence in a series of phrases more akin to an excited newsreader than a narrator.

I like the Hades series from Candice, but this ended up sounding like cliched pulp fiction. I am bailing on this book only a couple of hours in - the narration impairs any semblance of good writing, and this will be the first one where I ask for my money back.

Self-important, self-justifying narcissism. Pointless.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-2018

It was hard to listen to this welter of self-justifying, self-important narcissism, as he detailed the litany of breaches of systems for his own self-satisfaction. All the while bemoaning the injustices of the systems that prosecuted and incarcerated him.

The damage done to his mother, in particular, must have been profound.

I made it about three hours in before I did something rare for me and gave up, such was the level of animus I developed for this insignificant gob of human spittle.

What a complete waste of human space.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

A case of better read than being read to

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-2018

I enjoyed both the paper (analogue) version as well as the narrated version, but I found Shanahan’s narration a bit colourless. It was a case of getting more from the characters on the page and building them inside my head, and finding my own interpretations of the dialogue and narrative more satisfying than the narrated version.

Now, to the story. Extremely well written, and well plotted. Who says novels don’t have plot any more?! Extremely well-rounded characters fleshed out with clear, concise narrative and wonderful use of a range of literary devices - metaphor, alliteration, vernacular language etc. Excellent dialogue that was relevant to the environment and the circumstances.
The depiction of a place in crisis through drought was both harshly beautiful, and despairingly accurate. As was the way people turn in on themselves when there seems to be no hope, and combust from within.

A most satisfying read, and in Aaron Falk a finely developed character who we are already seeing more of through Jane Harper’s second novel, ‘Force of Nature’.