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Pieter

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Great story with some good arguments.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-2019

Overall this book makes a compelling argument for humanism, reason and enlightenment ideals, though it could have been much shorter.
The chapter on existentialism was certainly the weakest with some self defeating arguments, particularly with Pinker straw manning some of existential arguments.

Must read for all!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-2019

Haidt provides an excellent analysis of the fallout of the current culture wars in many western counties today. Furthermore, he provides several good starting points on how to fix it in the next generation.

This is a must read for everyone!

Good story, but too anecdotal

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-05-2019

I really enjoyed Dan's previous book, Disrupted, and was hoping for something similar. This was somewhat similar, but a bit more sanctimonious and anecdotal.

Overall it is worth the listen as his warning certainly has some merit.

Not as good as expected

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-2019

This was an enlightening book that takes you on the journey of the history of physics. While the story is engaging, the book tries too hard to convince the reader of a theory that seems in vogue. At times I felt like the intended audience are dissident academics rather than interested lay people.
Perhaps the book just ended on a bad note for me with what seemed to be a weak argument against 'God' : "the special conditions of our existance is not because of 'God', because 'God' is supernatural and that is not science".

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

A well written analysis of shame-culture

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5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-2018

A well written analysis of shame-culture online and in person. Ronson provides some sobering food for thought about the experience of public shaming both on the shamed and the shamer(s).

Repetitive musings of a fanboy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-05-2018

This is the first book that I was seriously tempted to return for a refund from the first chapter to the last. However, the path of least resistance was to continue listening, so I did.

Don't get me wrong, the message of this book is a good one once you get past the ad nauseam repetition and post hoc rationalisation. Perhaps the post hoc elements were particularly stark for me because I had just before completed an excellent book on randomness by Nassim Taleb. The role of luck in success is completely overlooked by Sinek, which I found ironic since he quotes Malcolm Gladwell who famously elaborated on it in his best-seller, Outliers.

Sinek's Apple worship and exageration aside, the message is a worthy one, but it is best summarised in the title.

A must read for all Homo Sapiens!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-2018

This is a book that I will be coming back to again and again. There is so much to take in.
Some of the ideas were novel to me, but most were not. However, the way they are all pieced together to form one elegant story of our history is spectacular.
Harari is a master of his craft.

Great listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-2017

Despite feeling like the book takes frequent tangents, Vance does an excellent job of telling the life story of Musk.

Confrontational and engaging

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-06-2017

Entirely thought provoking and fascinating discussion on some of the potential hazards on the human horison and whatay come from them. The book does not aim to predict the future, but follows several macro trends over the human existence to potential conclusions and discuss certain challenges associated with them.
The book may be very confrontational to religious people. However, it spares no-one as Harari broadens the definition of religion to include all ideologies and systemically breaks them down into their reason d'être and temporal nature. Whether you are a Christian, Hindu or Fundamentalist Liberal, he will challenge your world view.