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An terrifyingly excellent read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-09-2020

I love this book. I'm reading it for the third time now. Bostrom penetrates to the heart of the subject with his brilliant insights about this deep topic. The narration is perhaps a little monotone, but it actually works quite well with the strange subject matter, having a voice that is a little machine-like. I think it sounded fine. If you're at all interested in AI and the future of the human race (and beyond), then I'd highly recommend it! 10/10.

A superb piece of historical writing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-07-2020

This is an excellent book. The authors, by using previously unexamined sources of information, shed new light on this historic battle and challenge longheld misconceptions about what happened at the Midway Atoll in 1942. It's not entertainment history like Dan Carlin (who is also excellent at what he does). It's meticulously detailed and very little attempt was made to give the presentation of the information any drama. But the rapid destruction of Japan's Kido Butai is dramatic enough that it's still an interesting read. The book is presented from the Japanese perspective. It's a gripping tale of how groupthink and overconfidence led the Imperial Japanese Navy to allow the finest naval aviation striking force on the planet turn into scrap iron in a matter of minutes. For military history fans who don't mind a deep dive into a topic, it's an excellent read.

Decent read but almost nothing about the Chilis

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-2020

It's an decent read into Flea's childhood and teen years but stay WELL clear if you were expecting anything at all about the heyday of the Chili Peppers. He talks more about some random film he appeared in and this punk band he briefly played for in the 80s than the Chili Peppers. He talks about his personal relationships with Anthony, Hillel and Jack, but basically nothing about their career or anything about the band once they actually hit their stride.

A very slow burn that gets there eventually

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-2019

I came to this book after reading Green's flawless The Quiet American. Unfortunately this book was a bit dull in comparison, despite the evocative setting. It has moments of brilliance scattered throughout the book. And the closing chapters are very powerful. In order to get there you have to wade through a lot of repetitive self-imposed guilt trips from the protagonist, the whisky priest. Compounding this issue, the characters other than the priest are all somewhat hollow. They seem to exist entirely for the priest to interact with so the author can use the interactions to shed light on the priest's internal struggles. Even the priest himself seems at times simply a vessel for Green to go over his own issues with belief and guilt in countless ways throughout the book. If you like Green it may be worth it just to get to the stunning conclusion but I certainly found getting there a bit of a hard slog.

A true fantasy classic!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-2019

It's great to see this classic book available on Audible! Anyone who has read the Conan books will be partially familiar with the style of this book. However there are some differences. Conan is more well known these days due to the movies, but alas there was no Hollywood blockbuster about Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, even though these books were released much earlier and the writing is more nuanced. Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser are complex characters living in a complex world, full of scheming characters which the duo must outwit at every turn to stay alive. If you like any kind of 'sword and sorcery' vibes that moves beyond a simple portrayal of 'good vs evil', then you'll find plenty to love here. Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser aren't really heroes in the traditional sense. They are flawed and make rash or selfish choices sometimes, which makes this book more interesting than the typical fantasy epic. The introduction by the talented Mr Gaiman is also a nice touch!

A peerless novel from the master storyteller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-2019

The novel is flawless. There isn't a single misplaced word and it brims with tension throughout. I haven't found such a great novel in a long time. The characters jump off the page and will stay with you long after the last page is turned. There's a reason why this is considered a classic and it certainly lives up to its reputation and more. The novel is also strangely prescient, accurately predicting the quagmire the US would soon embroil itself in Vietnam over the two decades which followed its publication.

Decent read but I enjoyed his other books more.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-10-2019

I was really blown away by Harari's earlier books Sapiens and Homo Deus. This one was similar but didn't really do it for me. Much of the content in this seemed like it was recycling points he'd already made in the other two books. Maybe I shouldn't have read all three books basically in a row but this seemed like it was nonetheless the weakest of the three. If you're new to his work, get Sapiens instead. If you've already read both the books I've mentioned, I'd only recommend this if you're a megafan and are really gunning for more quite similar content.

King's still got it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-09-2019

I love this book. It's a good premise, tightly written and it's classic King. If you like his "psychic kids" books like The Shining, Dr Sleep or even It (I know that's different), then you'll probably dig this. I found his recent Bill Hodges Trilogy detective books a total snooze-fest. I don't know why he wrote so much in that world recently, it doesn't play to his strengths as a writer at all. I'm very glad he's back working on something he's good at with The Institute.

8 people found this helpful

A bit of a struggle

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-2019

I couldn't finish this. I loved Wilkins' book Giants of the Frost and the Autumn Castle was also pretty good. I found the characters in this a bit cringeworthy and unlikeable. The writing and premise didn't really grab me either. I'd suggest the other books I mentioned if you want to try Wilkins' work.

Fascinating journey into the origins of humanity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-2019

I loved this. I had never heard of Yuval Noah Harari before coming across this but I'm glad I gave this book a shot! He reminds me of authors like Christopher Hitchens who are able to take very complicated subjects and write concise, entertaining and insightful content about them. This isn't even a subject I normally spend much time reading about but this grabbed my attention right away and kept it throughout!