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Jennifer2

  • 94
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 95
  • ratings
  • Britt-Marie Was Here

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: Joan Walker
  • Length: 9 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 129

For as long as anyone can remember, Britt-Marie has been an acquired taste. It's not that she's judgmental or fussy or difficult - she just expects things to be done in a certain way. A cutlery drawer should be arranged in the right order, for example - forks, knives, then spoons. We're not animals, are we? But behind the passive-aggressive, socially awkward, absurdly pedantic busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams and a warmer heart than anyone around her realises.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Okay but not great

  • By Shakya on 18-06-2017

OK

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-03-2019

The story has good moments, but won't stay with me. If I had the chance again, I would return it. Also too much unnecessary profanity. Disappointing!

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks cover art
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

  • By: Rebecca Skloot
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 12 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 96

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer whose cancer cells – taken without her knowledge – became one of the most important tools in medicine

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Thank you Henrietta eternally grateful.

  • By Sara Paton on 18-09-2018

Really enjoyed this book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-2019

Even though I'd trained as a rn and read lots of medical info, I had never consciously heard of Hela cells. Rebecca must have done almost endless research for this book, and I thank her for it. The family she dealt with over reacted when it came to the religious aspect imo.
However I was swayed between entitlement of family and freedom of research. Our modern society gets too hung up on money at times.
I found this a fascinating story. Its opened lots of thought paths in my brain for further interest in the field experiments and research.

  • Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • By: Gail Honeyman
  • Narrated by: Cathleen McCarron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,508
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,219

Eleanor Oliphant has learned how to survive - but not how to live. Eleanor Oliphant leads a simple life. She wears the same clothes to work every day, eats the same meal deal for lunch every day and buys the same two bottles of vodka to drink every weekend. Eleanor Oliphant is happy. Nothing is missing from her carefully timetabled life. Except, sometimes, everything. One simple act of kindness is about to shatter the walls Eleanor has built around herself. Now she must learn how to navigate the world....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So much better than completely fine

  • By Bec on 29-10-2017

A wonderful story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-2019

A truly moving, beautiful story with tops narration. if there had not been blaspheme several times, I would have given 5 stars for story.

  • A Serial Killer's Daughter

  • By: Kerri Rawson
  • Narrated by: Devon O'Day
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    2.5 out of 5 stars 6

In 2005, Dennis Rader confessed without remorse to the murders of 10 people, including two children - acts that destroyed seven families and wrecked countless lives in the process. As the town of Wichita, Kansas, celebrated the end of a 31-year nightmare, another was just beginning for his daughter, Kerri Rawson. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Insight but too religious.

  • By Anonymous User on 04-03-2019

An amazing story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-02-2019

Kerri shares the story of her life before and after the charging of her father with horrific crimes.
We get to know the father who is like any other in his devotion and care for his family. The many camping trips and love for the outdoors, the strict upbringing and generally the reliable guiding figure for his wife and two children.
She conveys very well the struggle between not recognising the killer but still finding she loves the ''father she knew' until well into her twenties''. I struggled with her when the FBI called and she to's and fro's between "no that's impossible'' to ''hang on... he wasn't home that day'' discussions.
How does a person deal with such a tremendous shock which just keeps on shocking, day after day with each new revelation or memory.
Kerri succeeds in sharing the horror which keeps at her, while at the same time feeling the need to write to the man who has destroyed all their lives.
In keeping with her father's calculated, self absorbed, psychopathic character, he still manages to sound relatively normal and entitled in his letters back to her.
The family of this killer were as much victims as the families of those who were taken out of this life by the hand of Kerri's terrible parent.
It's an eye opener and I'm pleased to have heard it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Anything Is Possible

  • By: Elizabeth Strout
  • Narrated by: Kimberly Farr
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 50

Anything Is Possible tells the story of the inhabitants of rural, dusty Amgash, Illinois, the hometown of Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer who finally returns, after 17 years of absence, to visit the siblings she left behind. Reverberating with the deep bonds of family and the hope that comes with reconciliation, Anything Is Possible again underscores Elizabeth Strout's place as one of America's most respected and cherished authors.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By Caitlin on 15-05-2017

Didn’t like it

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-2019

I did not enjoy the story. Returned it. The book jumps all over the place. Too many characters, too many ideas.

  • The Day the World Came to Town

  • 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland
  • By: Jim DeFede
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2

When 38 jetliners bound for the United States were forced to land at Gander International Airport in Canada by the closing of US airspace on September 11, the population of this small town on Newfoundland Island swelled from 10,300 to nearly 17,000. The citizens of Gander met the stranded passengers with an overwhelming display of friendship and goodwill.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting info

  • By Jennifer2 on 10-02-2019

Interesting info

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-2019

An interesting series of events which happened as result of 9/11. It was quite a remarkable logistical exercise to get it all rolling efficiently with virtually no warning.
A down side to the book was trying to turn the passengers into 'individual stories'. That part was stretched, clichéd and even irritating at times. If the townsfolk were trying to hug strangers or distract them as often as suggested, it would have been unreal. I feel confident that they actually just did a fantastic job of welcoming and caring for the equivelant of a "town-full" of folk from all over the world.

  • Under Full Sail

  • By: Rob Mundle
  • Narrated by: Paul English
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

The story of the clipper ships, and the tens of thousands of migrants they brought to the Australian colony of the 19th century, is one of the world's great migration stories. For anyone who travelled to Australia before 1850, it was a long and arduous journey that could take as much as four months. With the arrival of the clipper ships, and favourable winds, the journey from England could be done in a little over half this time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable

  • By Jennifer2 on 05-01-2019

Very enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-2019

Fascinating details and stories about the exciting time of the Clipper Ships. So many stories to tell. Beautifully narrated, it fills in lots of historical detail of early travel to Australia. A great read.

  • South of Darkness

  • By: John Marsden
  • Narrated by: Paul English
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

Thirteen-year-old Barnaby Fletch is a bag-and-bones orphan in London in the late 1700s.Barnaby lives on his wits and ill-gotten gains, on streets seething with the press of the throng and shadowed by sinister figures. Life is a precarious business.When he hears of a paradise on the other side of the world – a place called Botany Bay – he decides to commit a crime and get himself transported to a new life, a better life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I loved this book

  • By Jennifer2 on 05-01-2019

I loved this book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-2019

I found this book very satisfying on all fronts. It's a lovely story of a young English boy who goes to New South Wales in the late 1700's, is historically accurate in broad detail and shares the beauty of Scriptural passages along with the contemplations of Bunyan in Pilgrim's Progress and writings of Alexander Pope. The only negative was the fairly abrupt ending.
I really enjoyed it and will look out for a sequel. Paul English reads so very well.

  • The Christmas Hirelings

  • By: Mary Elizabeth Braddon
  • Narrated by: Richard Armitage
  • Length: 3 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 385
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 357
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 355

Sir John Penlyon is planning to spend Christmas at his estate with his niece and his friend Danby, the closest thing he has to family since disowning his daughter years ago. (She eloped with the parson, who was, of course, penniless.) Danby suggests that at Christmastime the estate needs the presence of small children, and offers to find some - the “hirelings” - despite Sir John’s skepticism. Three children duly arrive, and the youngest, precocious four year-old Moppet, quickly endears herself to Sir John. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • not for me

  • By Kira Moloney on 08-02-2019

Predictable

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-12-2018

Routine, predictable. Quite boring.
Father too busy, sloughs off responsibilities to his sister and loses his girls. Circumstance brings one back.


  • Banjo

  • By: Grantlee Kieza
  • Narrated by: Peter Byrne
  • Length: 16 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

Balladeer, bushman, soldier, foreign correspondent - the remarkable life of Australia's greatest storyteller. A. B. ‘Banjo’ Paterson is rightly recognised as Australia’s greatest storyteller and most celebrated poet, the boy from the bush who became the voice of a generation. He gave us our unofficial national anthem, ‘Waltzing Matilda’, and treasured ballads such as ‘The Man from Snowy River’ and ‘Clancy of the Overflow’, vivid creations that helped to define our national identity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a great yarn

  • By Amazon Customer on 17-11-2018

Interesting enough but too dry

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-12-2018

I love the verse and stories of AB Patterson, yet this becomes dry to listen to. It’s genealogy doesn’t make for fascination in my view. I imagine it’s a very useful book for English students. The narration is fine as usual by Peter Byrne.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful