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Jennykching

Australia
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 6
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  • When Nietzsche Wept

  • By: Irvin D. Yalom
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael Garcia
  • Length: 15 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

Josef Breuer, one of the founding fathers of psychoanalysis, is at the height of his career. Friedrich Nietzsche, Europe's greatest philosopher, is on the brink of suicidal despair, unable to find a cure for the headaches and other ailments that plague him. When he agrees to treat Nietzsche with his experimental "talking cure", Breuer never expects that he, too, will find solace in their sessions. Only through facing his own inner demons can the gifted healer begin to help his patient.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Beautiful

  • By Anonymous User on 06-09-2018

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-08-2018

Brilliantly conceived, this is a great “teaching novel “ by the extraordinarily accomplished therapist Irvin Yalom. If you want to learn about existential philosophy, psychotherapy and navigating the human condition in order to create a more meaningful life, read this highly enjoyable book.

  • Quarterly Essay 51: The Prince: Faith, Abuse & George Pell

  • By: David Marr
  • Narrated by: Paul English
  • Length: 3 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

George Pell: leader of the Catholic Church in Australia, confessor to Tony Abbott. David Marr: the nation's leading biographer and investigative journalist. Cardinal George Pell is the most prominent Catholic leader in Australia at a time when the Church's handling of sexual abuse is being closely investigated. He is also the confessor of prime-minister-in-waiting Tony Abbott.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating, illuminating and essential reading.

  • By Jennykching on 08-08-2017

Fascinating, illuminating and essential reading.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-2017

Would you listen to Quarterly Essay 51: The Prince: Faith, Abuse & George Pell again? Why?

I have already listened to it a few times and could do so again. There is a great deal to ponder on in this slim but beautifully written and expertly researched volume.

What did you like best about this story?

It's been thoroughly researched and intelligently crafted. It made me very angry but I expected that. It was very illuminating to read. I now have a much better grasp of the extent of the Catholic Church's criminal indifference to the sex abuse scandal that has decimated their church. Pell was instrumental in helping to orchestrate the church's policy in this regard. His arrogance, narcissism and straight out callousness when it came to the children who were suffering is particularly galling.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

A Dark Priest.

Any additional comments?

Brilliant stuff from the wonderful David Marr.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Master

  • By: Colm Tóibín
  • Narrated by: William Hope
  • Length: 13 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of The Master by Colm Toibin, read by Geoffrey Howard.In January 1895 Henry James anticipates the opening of his first play, Guy Domville, in London. The production fails, and he returns, chastened and humiliated, to his writing desk. The result is a string of masterpieces, but they are produced at a high personal cost.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A wonderful book

  • By Jennykching on 08-08-2017

A wonderful book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-2017

What did you like most about The Master?

Com Toibin paints a very sympathetic and intelligent portrait of Henry James, which includes some of his rather major shortcomings. Despite these, one can't help feeling love for the man--and empathy for the emotional pain he often suffered. Toibin portrays his idiosyncratic personality and conveys his loneliness (which he no doubt rarely admitted to suffering, even to himself) very finely. This was coupled with his determination to maintain his freedom in order to devote himself to his art. I must say the book is infinitely more readable than some of James' works! The narrator was excellent-- his reading was perfectly pitched.. The book recreates the era beautifully also.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The material covering his relationship with Constance Fennimore Woodson was very finely wrought.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

That concerning his friendship with Constance Finnimore Woolson. Beautifully and sensitively crafted. I was almost in tears (and I'm not a crier). It stayed with me for many days.

Any additional comments?

Hats off to Colm Toibin and the narrator--this is a beautiful book.

  • Nutshell

  • By: Ian McEwan
  • Narrated by: Rory Kinnear
  • Length: 5 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 115

Nutshell is a classic story of murder and deceit, told by a narrator with a perspective and voice unlike any in recent literature. A bravura performance, it is the finest recent work from a true master. To be bound in a nutshell, see the world in two inches of ivory, in a grain of sand. Why not, when all of literature, all of art, of human endeavour, is just a speck in the universe of possible things?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable Ian McEwan

  • By Philip Manidis on 22-09-2016

A masterpiece -- brilliant, witty, profound and moving.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-2016

If I could give this book 6/5 stars, I would. One of the best books I've ever read (or rather, heard). I have had to stop myself from going back for a 4th listen. One of those books you grieve for when it's finished. There is so much in it--every sentence is so elegant, rich, beautifully crafted and full of meaning. And the narrator (Rory Kinnear) is marvellous.