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Loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-2021

Loved it when I first read it 40 years ago. Loved it when I saw the TV dramatization. Loved this. More. More. More. (Please)

Rich, intriguing - a privilege to listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-2021

There’s very little to add to the literary reviews of this extraordinary trilogy. Despite some confusion of who, where, what in Wolf Hall by The Mirror & the Light the tapestry of Thomas Cromwell’s mastery of & downfall in Henry’s court is rich, detailed,intriguing & moving. The politicking & manipulation unfolds at a fair pace, particularly toward the end. Having lived through Cromwells eyes for so long I felt his loss keenly.

The narrators are outstanding - particularly Julian Rhind Tutt. His naturalness, clarity, extraordinary range of character communicated through flawless accents & expression were an absolute treat. He made Bring up the Bodies hugely entertaining & it did take some time to get used to Joseph Kloska’s less sure (in comparison), slightly affected vocal characteristics in the final book. (I’m subsequently listening to all I can narrated by JRT to extend this pleasure as far as I can). Nevertheless this trilogy was an extraordinary listen - I loved every second.

Exquisite

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-06-2020

Beautifully written by Hannah Kent. Lyrical in parts, surprisingly moving, the landscape & harsh life of 19th century Iceland enveloping the whole. Morgen Christie’s performance was outstanding - a highlight. Sensitive, warm, beautifully modulated. The Icelandic names tripping of her tongue were worth listening to alone. Exquisite.

Good delivery but story disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-2020

Seemed essentially an ode to Tassie, which is fine by me. Or maybe that’s what I chose to think as there seemed to be so many disparate ‘aims’ in this novel, all a clunkily handled. Environmental, political diatribe; character driven thriller; love story. I’m guessing that it was aiming to be the character driven thriller, with love backstory (not particularly engaging), set against an environmental/political disintegration of the immediate future (loved prescience of the outrage of cruise ships with flu epidemics emptying their cargo directly into Hobart streets), but each strand seemed to overtake the other for focus, then lose momentum - except for the pol/environ diatribe. Having set up the characters with some care & promise, any suspense was quashed by ‘reportage’, the reveals were mundane, the characters forgotten, the ‘twists’ signposted from the start, the love story unconvincing. Frankly making a ‘touching’ night in a storm the focus as the ‘intrigue’ came to a head was a cheesy cop-out. The last couple of chapters all felt denouement. Made me wonder, frankly, where the editor was - he/she did little to support a potentially engaging writer by not demanding ‘cut’, ‘cut’ ‘cut’. I stuck with it but was so disappointed & frustrated by it.

4 people found this helpful

Delightful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-05-2020

Wonderful cast of well known British actors brings the Pallisers saga richly & entertainingly to life. The delight of Trollope made even more delightful. Loved it.

Delightful dramatization

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-05-2020

Trollope always entertaining & the entire Barchester Chronicles no exception. The full cast radio dramatization is absolutely delightful, with many recognizable voices. Loved it.

Loved This

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-2019

Every room was a rabbit hole of information. Bill Bryson's sardonic reading of his own rigorous research is a delight on every level. Chapter after chapter deserves triple listening - 2 in order to disentangle the densely packed facts (trivial or otherwise) and 1 to revel in his wit. No 4 - 2 for his wit!