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zico

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Interesting but Lacking

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-2020

An interesting (at times) book but to frank a bit too lacking in evidence to be taken that seriously. Arguments were often flawed, for example quotes the French as being an example as a successful non-monogamous society yet the French have one of the highest divorce rates in Europe. The book also failed to discuss the development of the monogamous pair bonded society and the influence of religion and culture to any great extent which was disappointing. Narrators constant dismissal of the "standard narrative" got a tad annoying after a while. Discussion of some of societies where multi-mate relationships predominate was interesting and while the concept probably does have some validity the book fell just of a bit short of what it promised.

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Choosing Loyalty to Kin or Being True to Oneself

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-2020

A masterpiece, such a powerful story and so well written. Originally before I started listening to this book i doubted it would interest me but from the first chapter my attention was grabbed and held until the end. This book really speaks about bonds to family and how important maintaining those relationships really are and the internal conflict this can generate when your values deviate from the family norm. As a health professional i doubt the father was bipolar despite the musings of the author over this in order to explain his behaviour. He was a fundamentalist, controlling and reckless but i really felt he loved his family and this created huge conflict in Tara as she sought to repair the relationship with her father but was ultimately rejected. A truly magnificent book superbly written.

Outstanding Story truly Reflects in Title

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-2019

I am a tennis player which is why i choose this title and was especially interested to see how it compared to Andre Agassi's book Open.I was gobsmacked by Jelena's story. It was unbelievable that a young professional athlete could experience such abuse and still function yet play professional tennis. Her story of courage was amazing and her desire to reconcile with her abusive deranged father is testament to her spirit and sense of a need to belong and to feel connected to family. It is understandable how she contemplated suicide after the end of her career and i am so glad she seems to have found happiness with her partner. An incredible story of how the human spirit can prevail in the most difficult of circumstances.

Nazism and Psychiatry a fascinating Insight

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-2019

This book is a fascinating expose of the impact on Nazism on medicine and psychiatry and the involvement of Hans Asperger in the Nazi Euthanasia program and the treatment of disabled and socially undesirable children in the Third Reich. The writer goes out of her way to give Hans Asperger a fair hearing but concludes he was complicit in the Nazi Eugenics program and indirectly sent children to their deaths. Thinking about this it was interesting how Nazism impacted every segment of society and how Asperger was a conformist in Nazi society who appeared to be most interested in advancing his career in line with prevailing Nazi ideology concerning the worth of certain individuals in society. The various conflicts are discussed in detail, especially how Asperger favourably treated some autistic children he thought redeemable and how he wrote off those he thought irredeemable. It was interesting he developed a strong gender bias in this respect. This is a fascinating listen with respect to how intelligent individuals can be corrupted by a totalitarian state and how societal values such as those that existed in Nazi Germany can overide an individuals natural sense of morality. Asperger reflects the complexity of how someone (in this case a medical professional) might behave in a society like Nazi Germany and how it is not all black and white. It seems Asperger was not a committed Nazi killer but was sucked in to the accepted "mainstream" Nazi ideas of how individuals must be subservient to the greater collective good and how defective individuals should be removed from society. In this sense the book has chilling lessons for the future with respect to how easy it is for the state to convince its citizens that some individuals have no worth. Well worth a read/listen!

Lacking In Inspiration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-2019

I remember reading the Chicken Soup books when I was young and enjoying them. Unfortunately i found this audiobook disappointing. With the same female narrator for most of the stories it was hard to identify with each persons story and some of the stories were frankly not that inspiring. Compared with some of the awesome autobiographies i have read this collection of schmaltzy reads was a bit of let-down.

Hard Act to Follow

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-04-2019

It was going to be a hard job to follow up Sapiens and so it proved Homo Deus was not in the same vain as its predecessor. Personally i found the authors attempts to reduce us (humanity) to algorithms to be irritating and repetitive. I didn't enjoy this book as much as Sapiens but it does have some interesting takes on the future of humanity.

Hard Going Dialogue Misses Mark

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-03-2019

There is certainly merit in the ideas of Adler but i didnt feel this audiobook did him justice. Sure i understand this was a recreation of how Socrates taught his followers but i found the dialogue approach with the youth and the philosopher to be distracting and frankly difficult to enjoy. In summary i found it hard to get to the end of this book and hard to rate favourably.

Fascinating review of world History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-03-2019

This is an amazing book, albeit a bit heavy in places but one of such profound insight into the nature of the development of human society and civilization that is certainly a must listen. Unlike Noah Harari's Sapiens with its colorful language and evocative analogies Guns Germs and Steel could be described as a little stodgy in places and in some sense somewhat academic in nature. This does not however distract the brilliant analysis by the author as to why some parts of the world have "developed" in comparison to others. A truly outstanding classic.

Story of great courage superbly read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-2018

This was such an incredible story of survival in the face of terrible evil. I felt the narrator was excellent and this increased the impact of Nadias escape from ISIS and the horrors they inflicted on the Yazidis. Having listened to this audiobook i now feel so much empathy for this people and their culture. Highly recommended.

Narrator did not appeal

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-2018

Excellent interwined story of Freddy Mercury and the arrival of Aids. Let down by the Narrator in my view. Could have been shortened without losing its impact

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