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Rheannen

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 6
  • ratings
  • The Dance of Deception

  • A Guide to Authenticity and Truth Telling in Women's Relationships
  • By: Harriet Lerner PhD
  • Narrated by: Harriet Lerner
  • Length: 2 hrs and 59 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5

From sexual faking to family secrets, Dr. Harriet Lerner reveals how the struggle toward truth-telling is at the center of our deepest longings for intimacy, authenticity, and self-regard. Drawing on more than two decades of clinical experience, Dr. Lerner articulates her rich philosophy and thoughtful guidelines about speaking out and holding back.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Tedious

  • By Anonymous User on 25-06-2017

Interesting but confusing at times

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-2016

This audiobook provided some interesting insights into deception, the different names we have for deception as both a destructive and protective tool, and those forms of societal and self-deception women have been taught to internalise via a patriarchal system.

Lerner provided the reading for this book in her usually engaging and approachable manner, and a number of the stories and perspectives she provided were truly interesting.

Where I feel this book falls apart a bit is that I do not get the same sense of a coherent and structure argument as I have received from The Dance of Anger.
Lerner generally seems to leave a lot of the decision making about how to address deception in our personal and public lives to the listener, which is great since I honestly appreciate her non-prescriptive tone. However, I feel that the exposé on how women, via patriarchal instruments, are affected by deception, was a bit lost in some waffle on different understandings of deception. In short, I feel she tried to cover a bit too much, but overall still provided an excellent book.

  • American Conspiracies

  • Lies, Lies, and More Dirty Lies That the Government Tells
  • By: Jesse Ventura, Dick Russell
  • Narrated by: George K. Wilson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6

In this explosive account of wrongful acts and ongoing cover-ups, Jesse Ventura takes a systematic look at the wide gap between what the American government knows and what it reveals to the American people. For too long, we the people have sat by and let politicians and bureaucrats from both parties obfuscate and lie. And according to this former Navy SEAL, former pro wrestler, and former Minnesota governor, the media is complicit in these acts of deception.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Richard on 16-05-2018

Intriguing and Compelling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-2016

I really enjoyed this audio-book. Jesse Ventura and Dick Russell have done some thorough research to present some interesting arguments for a number of conspiracies throughout American history.
The great thing about this book is that they try to avoid the sensationalism associated with the word 'conspiracy' by providing a lucide definition of what they mean by conspiracy - forget aliens and faked moonlanding claims.

Some of the conspiracies discussed are historically factual, and the bulk of Ventura's argument on this account is that they haven't been discussed in the teaching of modern history and as such we fail to learn from them or understand how different institutions have interacted and reacted with each other historically.
Other conspiracies are still contended but some compelling arguments are put forward for them. Some delved into may seem like a bit of a stretch, but even then it is intriguing listening to the manner in which Ventura argues for them.

  • The Dance of Anger

  • A Woman's Guide to Changing the Patterns of Intimate Relationships
  • By: Harriet Lerner Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Harriet Lerner
  • Length: 3 hrs and 2 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

While anger deserves our attention and respect, women still learn to silence our anger, to deny it entirely, or to vent it in a way that leaves us feeling helpless and powerless.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Wish I listened to the Sample beforehand

  • By Rebekah on 11-04-2018

Great Content and Approachable Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-2016

Would you listen to The Dance of Anger again? Why?

I would definitely listen to this book again.
Lerner provides very helpful examples and advice for analysing our moments of anger and turning the scenario around to allow the recognition of anger create constructive changes in our lives and our relationships with other.
Her narration is natural and engaging, and there were some moments that made me laugh.
I genuinely enjoyed listening to this book and will probably go back to it in order to keep remembering her tips.

  • Tribes

  • We Need You to Lead Us
  • By: Seth Godin
  • Narrated by: Seth Godin
  • Length: 3 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 339
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 291
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 289

Tribes are groups of people aligned around an idea, connected to a leader and to each other. Tribes make our world work, and always have. The new opportunity is that it's easier than ever to find, organize, and lead a tribe. The Web has enabled an explosion of all kinds of tribes - and created shortage of people to lead them. This is the growth industry of our time. Tribes will help you understand exactly what's at stake, and why YOU can and should lead a tribe of your own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simple and easy to listen to

  • By Amazon Customer on 25-10-2016

Some interesting concepts but a lot of waffle

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-2016

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

There were truly some moments, when listening to this book, where I was inspired by what Godin said. However, he spent a good part of the first section of this book, and a number of sections in later chapters waffling on about what a tribe is and what leadership is in a way that didn't provide clear definitions but seemed to attempt pseudo-inspirationalism.
His overemphasis of the word 'TRIBE' and 'LEADERSHIP' at moments of the book was really annoying - like, we get it, the book is about tribes and leadership - we get the connection between the title of the book and the content.
However, I gave this three stars overall because of those moments where his message came through loud and clear and I felt a push to strive beyond mediocrity. In that sense it was worth it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Amityville Horror

  • By: Jay Anson
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

In December 1975, the Lutz family moved into their new home on suburban Long Island. George and Kathleen Lutz knew that, one year earlier, Ronald DeFeo had murdered his parents, brothers, and sisters in the house, but the property - complete with boathouse and swimming pool - and the price were too good to pass up. This is the shocking true story of an American dream that turned into a nightmare beyond imagining for the Lutz family, who were forced to flee their new home in terror.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • What should have been a wonderful scare...

  • By rosewart on 27-10-2016

Less of a non-fiction - more of a good horror story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-2016

I came into this with a fairly open mind as to what happened at Amityville. At this stage I feel relatively unconvinced but entertained by a good story nonetheless.
The writing style of the book doesn't lend itself well to the non fiction category it's in, told in a very subjective first person way. It is an interesting and enjoyable story, however, I found the reading of this story overly dramatic at times.
Overall I enjoyed but am not convinced of it as a nonfiction.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful