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soo jay

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Shows promise - needs a good editor!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-2020

I wanted to like this book, I really did. But it reads more like a collection of creative writing exercises pulled out of the bottom drawer, shuffled about and stapled together. There is no suspense as the main characters are barely introduced before they start acting "strangely". And constant references to a woman called Aisling are handled very amateurishly. Just a name dropped in to the muddle of the protaganist's musings. If there was going to be a big reveal about Aisling, I couldn't be bothered to wait around for it. I couldn't finish this book. The author does write well, but needs a damn good editor or at least a willingness to rewrite and rewrite again. This book could have been so much better. Tuppence Middleton has a wonderfully melodious voice and it was the fact that she was reading the book that enticed me to give it a try.

By far the best in the series so far.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-09-2020

I am far from being a diehard Rowling fan, but this latest book in the Cormoran Strike series had me enthralled for all of its 32+ hours. Galbraith/Rowling has such a good ear for dialogue, the myriad characters in this story spring effortlessly to life for the reader. Toward the end of the book, the number of characters does become a bit overwhelming but I suspect they would be easier to keep track of with a hard copy rather than in this audible edition. So much more than just a detective story, the author brings a deeply compassionate intelligence to the human dramas which drive the central plot - the solving of a 40 year old cold-case - and which swirl in and out of the main protaganists' contemporary lives. Strike and Robin are so real to me now I am dismayed to think how long I may have to wait to meet with them again. Robert Glenister's narration is, as always, perfection. His voice is never dreary, his accents entertaining and identifiable, and his reading, like the story itself, is beautifully paced.

Another winner from Andrew Cartmel.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-2020

I love these Vinyl Detective stories! Always entertaining, intriguing, and witty. As a crime novel addict, I appreciate a break from the usual and even obligatory post-mortem scene (some police detectives seem to have an unhealthy compulsion to attend post-mortem examinations) and, instead, follow the unnamed Vinyl Detective and his charming 'honey pie' Nevada in their dogged quests for rare vinyl records and upmarket secondhand fashion while simultaneously dodging danger and solving crime. With 'Low Action' the author has delivered another sparkling installment in a series which just keeps getting better. The narrator of the series was very well chosen indeed; he has the perfect voice for the age and style of the main protagonist, as well as a flair for envoicing (is that a word?) a wide array of other characters. I do wish he'd looked up how to pronounce Persephone for this book, though.

Too long, needlessly complicated.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-08-2020

I loved the first book in this series, didn't like the second book at all, ADORED the third book (could not stop listening, I was so engrossed)...and now this fourth tale of Cormoran Strike?? It had its moments but really tedious focus on Robin & Matthew's failing marriage. And the "crimes" were so far apart, both in historical terms and in pages turned I forgot I was reading a crime novel. The scene on the barge where the murderer tells Robin every...single...thing...that happened, could have happened, didn't happen ..... was just ridiculous. I hope to see a few new characters who stay with the story, in future Strike novels. The Scottish ex-army guy looks promising. I still love Strike and Robin and will continue to follow their exploits. Just hope there's a bit more excitement next time. Robert Glenister gave his usual magnificent performance but I bet he was as sick of reading out those pretentious and unnecessary Ibsen quotes as this listener was of hearing them. So annoying!!

Brilliant! The best in the series so far.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-2020

I have really grown to love the DCI Tom Reynolds series. While I didn't enjoy the previous book in the series (The Darkest Place) as much as the first three, The Boy Who Fell has more than restored my addiction. Intriguing, puzzling, and rich with believable characters - I can't wait to listen to the next book. Aoife Mcmahon's narration is superb.

Well written but ultimately unsatisfying.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-05-2020

This was my first Margaret Kirk book and I was delighted to discover an assured crime writer who delivers characters to care about, believable dialogue, and a touch of humour. It was a bit like reading Stuart MacBride lite. What this story doesn't deliver is any suspense. If you haven't worked out "who dunnit it" after a few chapters, you're just not trying. I kept listening to the end just in case there was a breath-taking twist but no, the murderer was precisely who I expected. Steve Worsley's narration was a delight as always.

A diverting read, but not my favourite.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-05-2020

I've read all the Tony MacLean series and I have to admit I found this latest one a bit disappointing. There were one or two interesting new characters and mercifully this one was free of the annoying Mrs. Saifra (I'm guessing the spelling), but, omg, why is Tony still so stilted. He is supposed to be in a long-term relationship with Emma and they are like two cardboard cutout people. Get out Emma, find a man with a pulse. The story is reasonably interesting but swerves predictably into Hammer House of Horrors at the climax, after a tediously detailed description of some old farm building. Clunky references to past cases litter this book, presumably to remind the reader of early parts of the series. It is really distracting. I did enjoy the character of the retired Deputy Chief Inspector (?) who is living in an aged care home. The author gives her the dignity of having lived a useful and important life, which is often not acknowledged about elderly people, especially women. Ian Hanmore's narration was excellent, as always.

WORST. AUSTRALIAN. ACCENT. EVER.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-2020

Normally I could listen to Aoife read the phone book. What was she thinking?! Aoife, sweetie, your Maud sounds like you learned your Australian accent from watching Meryl Streep playing Lindy Chamberlain. News flash - Lindy is a New Zealander. Maud also seems to drift into a bit of Ellie May Clampett. Just godawful. I couldn't finish the book as it was SO hard to listen to once Maud reappeared. Pity, as I've heard good things about Dervla McTiernan's crime novels, but I like to read a series from the beginning. No way would I put myself through this torture again.

Best narration I have heard on Audible.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-04-2020

I can tell I am going to enjoy the Matthew Shardlake series for its historical setting and entertaining mysteries. But it the wonderful narrator, Anton Lesser, who will keep me coming back for more. I'd give his performance ten stars if I could.

Not up to his usual standard.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-03-2020

I've read all the Detective Tony McLean books, and this one just seemed to lack something. It felt a bit "phoned in" and didn't engage my emotions. Hopefully the next in the series will see James Oswald return to his usual spellbinding form.