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Sharon

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  • 21
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Waste of time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-2020

This is 2 and a half hours of a very average, boring couple fighting. There is nothing interesting about them or the fight. The woman is continually described as beautiful, like that's some sort of a virtue. She's in marketing, he's is advertising, they no longer like each other very much. If you are on the fence about having children, listening to this might help you decide. If you are a like to listen to privileged middle class capitalists bicker, this might be the book for you. I DNFd it with less than an hour to go because I did not care what happened to these boring, whiney, tedious people. The book was free, but no-one can give me that hour and a half of my life back.

DNF - did not enjoy

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-07-2020

DNFd it when I realised I was spending more time on Goodreads writing comments about how I wasn't enjoying it! Celeste comes across as wholesome, but she's super bitchy and negative. She has a friend she refers to as "her best Gay" This book is in no particular order. This review is also in no particular order. Mainly the book just wasn't that interesting. And once something is more annoying than interesting, there is really not much point continuing. She continually uses phrases like "hashtag blessed" and "sad face emoji". Maybe that works in the written book, but this was an audio book. Also, a book is not intagram. I like Celeste Barber on Instagram. Maybe she's someone who is better in short doses. Very short doses.

Even better than I expected

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-11-2019

This (audio) book surprised me, in the best possible ways. 1) The cover and blurb made it sound like it was going to be light and fluffy and fun. It was actually a fairly deep, serious act of gonzo journalism. It got heavy - for Marianne, but not heavy for the reader / listener. 2) it was narrated by the author - and I love that in a memoir. Even better, the bits of the book where she talks to her mother - are recorded by her mother. Gold. Highly recommend. Entertaining with an solid heart and thoughtfulness.

Becoming Nicole cover art

Interesting story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-2019

This was an interesting book about a topic that fascinates me, It was told in quite a journalistic style, which is not surprising since Amy Ellis Nut is a journalist. It told a story, and gave some interesting facts, and told us what people were feeling. This book doesn't really deeply explore those feeling though, it focusses on actions. While i enjoyed it, and am glad i listened to it, I thought This Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel covered similar ground in a more engaging manner. That said, I think Nutt does what she set out to do, and did it in a competent way.

Heartbreaking and uplifting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-2019

By turns heart-rending and uplifting, this addiction memoir is a very strong example of the genre.

I'm not sure why this book was written

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-2019

This is self-indulgent poverty porn where the author (who is so lonely, so very lonely, which is pretty much all she is telling about herself) makes the destruction of a gritty grotty homosexual pre-aids New York city into her own personal tragedy. Dear Olivia would have been excluded from that scene too, but she doesn't consider that, too busy romanticising poverty, art, homosexuality and abuse. And the past. The present is terrible. The future unthinkable. Everything is awful. If this is meant to be a scholastic work it's shallowly researched, if it's meant to be a memoir it doesn't actually reveal much about Olivia herself. It felt like Olivia Lang spent a year in New York - for whatever reason, she tells us why she got there, but not why she stayed while being so lonely. So lonely. She's so lonely. She keeps telling us that. She's too lonely to make friends. I guess she needed to finance the trip so she wrote this book.

3 people found this helpful

I can see why this is a classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-2018

I like to dip into traditional classics, because it makes me feel like I'm "improving" myself. When I found this in my Audible library (maybe I got it in a sale?) I decided to read it. I went into it with trepidation - the last Dickens I read was the ridiculous A Tale of Two Cities, but this book surprised me. It's quite lovely, and an easy listen - Simon Vance narrating certainly helps.

Well read, but strange chronology

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-2018

I didn't know who Trevor Noah was before buying this - I think Audible had it on special, and i love a memoir read by the author. The positives: Trevor Noah has an interesting take on growing up poor I learnt a lot about apartheid, and how it affected people He reads his story very well The negative: The story moves through time oddly, going backwards and forwards. This is particularly jarring in the last hour, when he basically retells the story but this time in relation to his mothers husband. It's like someone read the first draft and said "you'd better explain about Able" so he tacked it on the end instead of integrating it into the narrative.

A suprisingly intersting single topic history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-2017

This book looks at the rise and fall of Nazi Germany through a single lens; that of drug use. This is probably not ideal if the reader / listener doesn't know anything else about the period, but if you already know some of the history, this book provides a fascinating extra dimension.

The novella makes a strong return

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-2017

This is a wonderful linked series of novellas. I liked some of the stories more than the others, but they were all interesting, difference and yet made a cohesive whole.

The different narrators for each story were a really nice addition.