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Anonymous

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  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 6
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  • The Secret Teachings of Plants

  • The Intelligence of the Heart in the Direct Perception of Nature
  • By: Stephen Harrod Buhner
  • Narrated by: Stephen Bel Davies
  • Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

All ancient and indigenous peoples insisted their knowledge of plant medicines came from the plants themselves and not through trial-and-error experimentation. Less well known is that many Western peoples made this same assertion. There are, in fact, two modes of cognition available to all human beings - the brain-based linear and the heart-based holistic. The heart-centered mode of perception can be exceptionally accurate and detailed....

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • (for me) Unlistenable

  • By Anonymous User on 23-02-2019

(for me) Unlistenable

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-02-2019

The writing sounded poetic and somewhat interesting, and i was keen to learn something from this book but i could not get past the narrator's voice. i tried persevering and listened to this book for an hour over about 3 sessions but could not listen to it anymore.

Also, the book chapters are preluded by several epigrams (quotes or poems from other sources), and epigrams are also included within the main body of chapters, but they get lost in the narration of the text and so you think you are listening to the main text until the narrator finishes the epigram by citing the original authour, such as "Goethe" or "Lao Tzu". it's annoying, but is not the narrator's fault. it may be that audio-book producers could work out a way of notifying a listener that they are about to be read an epigram. when you read a physical book, you can see the epigram (in an indented paragraph, in italics, or whatever) but there is no such differentiation in an audiobook.

  • Atomic Habits

  • An Easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad Ones
  • By: James Clear
  • Narrated by: James Clear
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,260
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,055
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,048

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Atomic Habits by James Clear, read by the author. A revolutionary system to get 1 percent better every day. People think when you want to change your life, you need to think big. But world-renowned habits expert James Clear has discovered another way. He knows that real change comes from the compound effect of hundreds of small decisions - doing two push-ups a day, waking up five minutes early or holding a single short phone call. He calls them atomic habits. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You need this book. Yes, you! You need it.

  • By Anonymous User on 26-10-2018

physical copy would be more helpful with this one

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-02-2019

i listened to this audiobook while otherwise engaged in manual work tasks. i would have liked to take physical notes or look at the presented methods and checklists so i could get them straight in my head to make best use of them.

to that end, i do not think an audiobook is the best format for this book. The audiobook is good to run you through the simple ideas that hopefully make a great difference to your life if you create new habits to achieve your desired identity (as per book), but the physical book is better going to help you make sense of this and be easily able to refer back to.
Having listened to the audio, i'm thinking i need to see a hard copy.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Brave New World

  • By: Aldous Huxley
  • Narrated by: Michael York
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 459
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 416

When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

Cloning, feel-good drugs, anti-aging programs, and total social control through politics, programming, and media: has Aldous Huxley accurately predicted our future? With a storyteller's genius, he weaves these ethical controversies in a compelling narrative that dawns in the year 632 A.F. (After Ford, the deity). When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth revisiting

  • By Nienke Lucas on 17-07-2015

Classic.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-2019

Good story, I just got annoyed by the announcements at the end of the novel - there was no silent gap to contemplate the ending, it launched straight into a different accented voice to read the copyright and other stuff. Insensitive.