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Nobody has died from eating rice vegetables yet

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-2017

This is a confronting piece of research, sure to touch a nerve; whatever your eating habits are.

I studied nutrition at an academic level until I couldn't believe what I was reading and hearing any more. It just didn't add up, let alone make any common sense.

Do I agree with every recommendation set out in the Mc Dougall diet? Nope.The author does encourage open debate and (having a quick look through the website videos), isn't at all closed minded. There's some conflicting information within the book in places and it does go into rant mode periodically.

I found the overuse of testimonials and study after study references tedious, but someone else might hear just what they need to that day. The pdf file of recipes is a great reference, and makes up for a lot of the book's shortcomings.

One thing is certain, rice, potatoes and a rainbow of veggies and fruit making up your appropriate calorie intake will not make your life any shorter with disease, and they certainly won't kill you unless you choke on them.

Great performance - not so keen on the story line

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-2017

An homage to Conan Doyle, and the narration is very engaging. By the Author's own admission, he likes to push boundaries, and this story line might well have that effect for some.
For myself, It's one of those "Gee, I hope this isn't going to end up about....Oh. It is", stories.
A really gripping narrative, well performed and very much in the true Sherlockian style for the most part. I just prefer my Holmes with a little more 'innocence'. The original stories only ever needed the slightest insinuation to leave any gruesome details to the reader's imagination.
Be that as it may, this is the 21st Century and it wasn't written by Conan Doyle. I thoroughly enjoyed listening to Derek Jacobi, his style and talent certainly added to the adventure and I look forward to hearing his other performances of the original stories.

Best suited as a hardcopy or companion to hardcopy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-2017

A lot of data referenced, which might be useful to students, but some studies are too outdated to be included as references; even though the content is engaging and thought provoking. The narration is on point most of the way, sounding interested and understanding of the material.

A strange title too, given that the China study itself comprises a small part of the information - but it is defining in the theme of the overall text.

As a former student of Nutritional Science, I find it a good book on a personal level, and can understand the author's frustration; but it does get a little long in the tooth and sounds like an epic whinge a lot of the time from about half way through as the Author reflects on his own history with the subject matter. It's catching - and you might feel depressed, or angry or just as frustrated as the Author a lot of the time. Not a good bedtime listen.
A hard copy would be better, making skipping to or looking up what you want to get to easier.

If you are considering a change in diet away from animal proteins, this is an excellent reference and starting point from an author who has researched and formulated methods of validating/quantifying research to be implemented on an International scale; making it an invaluable personal reference if you are inclined towards the subject matter (mainly, not eating Animal Proteins).

I'd like to rate it higher, but it's just not engaging material for an audiobook, and the Author has decades of gripe to get through, this volume being just one episode.

2 people found this helpful

"Wonderful!, I ejaculated."

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-08-2017

What did you like most about Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection?

Recovering from recent illness was the perfect opportunity to become absorbed in the childishly cathartic process of being read to. Snuggled up, and often with high fever, one can still delight in the timeless adventure and gripping social/psychological commentary that is the 'real wood' beneath the veneer of Conan Doyle's Victorian London. Every speck and reek, from dank fogs to the choking coal and mists of human filth is washed into the room. This is swiftly dispatched from being unpleasant, as the inner workings of each scene, character and plot are so detailed as to not make any one aspect overwhelming or depressive. And there is always a calm and assured explanation by Holmes himself at the end of each adventure as to the methods and innermost workings of each case, on the off chance one missed it, or nodded off at 104 degrees farenheit.
The first time listener/reader is given plenty of time to formulate their own impressions of each case, but there is always an element of surprise which Doyle serves up in a friendly and wistful way, giving one a literary pat on the back and a wink for maybe having missed it; or never even conceiving of such a thing in the first place.
In decades past, the radio play/serial was a source of timed amusement; and was the height of technology at that time. Television and modern age of the internet have brought their own take on what are now seen as old classics. This version of the Audiobook brings all of that together, casting a modern eye far back into the past, only to retrieve what is most potent, useful and unchanging-the art of the story and the suspension of disbelief.

Who was your favorite character and why?

As a born and bred South Australian from Adelaide, the Australian characters (especially the females) as read by Stephen Fry are most entertaining.

Which character – as performed by Stephen Fry – was your favourite?

All the characterizations are very well delivered and it's easy to forget that there is but one narrator. As much as Conan Doyle convinces us that there is/was a very real duo in Holmes and Watson, we are as easily convinced that there are numerous and individual characters present in the narrative enthusiastically delivered by Stephen Fry.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

I think "Fry on Holmes" sounds like something he'd be involved with. Perhaps a documentary series rather than the likes of the Hollywood film he had a small (?) but memorably nude scene in, playing Holmes' brother Mycroft.

Any additional comments?

So glad to have experienced this, and can highly recommend it as a first timer to Holmes' adventures or even for the most staunch sherlockian who may wish to cross swords with Fry over his genuine and life-long researched interest in both the story and the author for dibs on who has the most affection for Conan Doyle's legacy and craft.