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Rainer

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  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 20
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Terrible Quality Audio

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-2016

What did you like best about The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of the 20th Century? What did you like least?

Favourite Story was the Crystal Spheres - it sounds mystical, but it's not at all - and it still holds up to today

What did you like best about this story?

Most of the stories were timeless.

Which character – as performed by David Ackroyd and Wil Wheaton – was your favourite?

Don't really recall either narrators - they sounded more like they were recorder 20+ years ago.

Was The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of the 20th Century worth the listening time?

Definitely worth listening to, if anything for quick bite sized stories - good for 1 hour road trips.

Any additional comments?

The audio quality is TERRIBLE. It sounds like a recording of a telephone call through a radio on a cassette tape. I found a lot of the more unusual names and words impossible to hear clearly, which is kinda important for science fiction.Performance and stories 5/5Audio Quality 0/5

1 person found this helpful

Great follow-up to the first book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-2015

I won't go into the story or anything like that, but I will review the Audio book instead.

This is an immediate continuation of the story from the first book, which ended on a cliff-hanger.

The reader did a great job. The first thing I noticed was that he pronounced some words slightly different to the readers in the first book. Most notably, Lusus. I think the pronunciation in the second book was correct.

The other thing I noticed was the stark difference in the way Silenus talked. Not in a bad way, but I never got used to it. I think I preferred the reader from the first book for Martin.

The shifting narrative from first-person to 3rd person worked well.

The only weird thing I found is that occasionally throughout the book all of the sudden music would just start playing in the background for no apparent reason. Weird.

Anyway, I don't need to recommend this book, if you read the first, then you'll probably read the second. If you enjoyed Hyperion, then you'll enjoy The Fall of Hyperion.

4 people found this helpful

A story that gets a little caught up in itself

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-2015

I got this book on a recommendation from a forum. I was looking for a good "fish out of water" sci-fi.

The story starts out with a lot of great promise. The narrators Scottish accent added to the character of the story. The first act was full of surprises and made you feel pretty good about where the story is going.

The second act takes you into a new location completely different from the first, however it really lacked detail, and whilst the character wasn't exposed to a lot of what was going on, it still would have been nice as the reader to be a little more informed.

The third act is when the story starts to go off the rails a little. Without offering any spoilers, it's safe to say the storyline derails a little into other familiar stories. You've probably heard comparisons drawn with The Hunger Games, and they aren't unwarranted. The difference though is it seems that nothing is a problem for the main protagonist and things that seem completely impossible suddenly are. Of course, this is part of what drives the story, but it's quite often that you can only suspend your disbelief so far.

The final act of course sees our hero triumphant (spoiler alert) or is he? At this point you really don't care because you know he is. There's really no surprises from one scene to the next.

The book focuses entirely on one character throughout, and offers little insight into the other characters in the book, including the hero's love interest.

The descriptions of the different classes in the book seemed confusing to me. They're described as superhuman and freakish. I didn't understand what the author meant by "sigils" on them to identify them, and something about wings? I didn't get that part. A lot of that kind of science fiction is skimmed over early in the book but is never revisited, as the book really becomes a fantasy set on another planet.

I did enjoy most of the book, the writer is clear in his style, but lacks technical detail and could have used a little more character development. I have heard they're making it into a movie, it will be interesting to see others' impressions on the book.

2 people found this helpful

A great story about time travel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-03-2014

What did you like most about The Forever War?

The insight into what the human race might be like hundreds of years from now.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Obvioulsy it has to be William, but Charlie was pretty cool too. William, the main character is very relateable to.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Probably when he first arrives at Heaven for rehab. Everyone is talking English, but with a weird dialect.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I liked the ending, can't say for spoiler reasons.

Any additional comments?

If you like time travel and stories about the future, then this is for you. If you don't like war stories, don't stress too much, the military stuff is very light, it's more about the characters.