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Lukasz Termer

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Very important work on civil disobedience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-11-2020

This is a great book, an academic approach to successful, non violent uprisings. Anyone interested in how a movement can succeed should read this book.

Sagas are great! But you need to FFWD a lot.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-2019

This book is in keeping with tradition of ABC like storytelling. In between Sagas, which are performed incredibly well, you will end up listening to (unless you fast forward) what the authors ate, drank and what the views are like in Iceland. You will also get descriptions of their accommodation and car they rented. I understand Kari's urge to tell the the world what the icelanders are like. I understand the need of relating Sagas to present times. I understand the need to having to frame them somehow. At the first glance the story of Kári Gíslason seems like a neat way of doing that. The problem is, two paragraphs would have been enough, but it seems like it's 60%. The juxtaposition of everyday travel mediocrity, being cold, feeling merry from too many beers with colourful stories of Vikings full of stakes and jeopardy leaves me feeling somewhat shortchanged.

8 people found this helpful

This Changes Everything cover art

An absolute must read.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-05-2016

This book is a powerful reminder on how economics and ecology are intertwined. Educate yourself people! It's time to mobilise. If you are pissed off about current state of affairs, fed up with politics and policies. Read this. It will calm you down, and give you direction. Enjoy!

It's a great book, but...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-2016

First of all I'd like to say that despite author's few hang ups, it's a great book. A kind of gateway into many alternative concepts about social structures. What bothered me was the read. It felt more as if Mr Pinchbeck sat in a room with a bunch of notes in front of him and simply talked about stuff. If that's the case, kudos to him for his brain capacity and ability channel all that knowledge. If not, I believe this audiobook should be a tad cheaper. There are audiobooks for the same price with real narration. All in all, I'm pleased this sort of literature is out for wider public to engage with.