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Peter

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A well researched scientific argument that our universe is generated by consciousness.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-09-2020

If a bird, a fish and a snake were to make their way to the Omega point, they would each take their own path to the same point. In the same way there are different paths to truth and Alex has chosen to take the science path. His extensive research into many credible sources and explanation of recent findings in science are effectively communicated with the narrator articulating very clearly. If the narrator took singing lessons he would get five stars. I really enjoy the way Alex paints a positive picture but I do not share the optimistic view that we are making massive strides towards synthesis with the Omega point. The may happen suddenly with AGI but for now I think that the sages of old had a better handle on enlightenment than we do now. I would like to see Alex tackle the question of what sort of free will decisions bring us closer to the Syntellect emergence. Although there was a fair amount of repetition in the book, it served well for reinforcement. Thank you Alex for all you work to produce a stimulating read.

I’m back!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-08-2020

A great concept for introducing ethics but the dialogue and voiceover for the female voice was distracting, being too nice and condescending. Peter’s anger at Bobby dragged on for a bit too long.

A clear and concise explanation of how we could be living in a computer simulation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-05-2020

Of the books I have read so far on the Simulation Argument, this book provides the clearest explanation of how we could be in a computer simulation based on what we know of our world, where we have been with spiritually and where we are going with technology. As can be expected with Rizwan’s background in computer games, he spends much of the book covering how a simulation we could be living in compares with a computer game. His reasoning is strong enough to convince many that we live in a computer simulation. Although he touched on the role of advanced artificial intelligence and the possibility of other dimensions with different laws of physics, most of his discussion was within our current knowledge of physics. As he covered, advanced AI and the Simulation are intertwined. The consequence of this and the technical singularity is that advanced AI would likely throw our scientific models out the window and many of the limitations and design aspects of the simulation Rizwan described become irrelevant. Rizwan covered the two scenarios of a NPC only and a PC simulation but not much about a simulation with both and how they would get on. I would have liked Rizwan to have expanded more on the possible commercial justification of a simulation for humans based on his activities in venture capital investments and come up with potential strategies for commercial interests. He touched on nested simulations but did not expand on how the resolution of a simulation inside a simulation changes and the implication of higher level simulations having higher level technologies, beliefs and agendas. These topics were covered in another book on the Simulation Argument : The Word of Bob - an AI Minecraft Villager. I would have also liked him to expand on the question of a simulation censuring information about itself to preserve its appearance of being real. I wonder if he has experienced that in his efforts to spread more information about the simulation argument.

Tranquil and prosperous aborigines?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-2019

With so much knowledge lost, this book and any other well researched books on the topic are worth a read. The author repeatedly tells us how abundant and sustainable the food of natives was and how their customs reduced wars to occasional squabbles. These conclusions defy logic. Do the math. How large would the population grow over 70,000 years if there was plenty to eat and peaceful lives to live. This question was not answered and makes one wonder whether life was as rosey as the author claims.

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