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E. J. Lizier

Highett, Victoria, Australia
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 12
  • ratings
  • Billions & Billions

  • Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium
  • By: Carl Sagan
  • Narrated by: Adenrele Ojo, Ann Druyan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 10

In the final book of his astonishing career, Carl Sagan brilliantly examines the burning questions of our lives, our world, and the universe around us. These luminous, entertaining essays travel both the vastness of the cosmos and the intimacy of the human mind, posing such fascinating questions as how did the universe originate and how will it end, and how can we meld science and compassion to meet the challenges of the coming century?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clear and concise.

  • By E. J. Lizier on 02-12-2018

Clear and concise.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-2018

Reading this reminded me how much I mourn Sagan's passing. His level of understanding and clarity of voice are sadly missed.
I only wish he could have read his own work.

  • Discrimination and Disparities

  • By: Thomas Sowell
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 5 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 19

Discrimination and Disparities challenges believers in such one-factor explanations of economic outcome differences as discrimination, exploitation, or genetics. It is listenable enough for people with no prior knowledge of economics. Yet the empirical evidence with which it backs up its analysis spans the globe and challenges beliefs across the ideological spectrum.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eminently sensible

  • By E. J. Lizier on 02-12-2018

Eminently sensible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-2018

Sowell delivers yet another eminently sensible and rational view via a balanced and reasonable look at statistics without either overstating or understating the case. Unlike so many who shape a narrative via the use of cherry-picked numbers, Sowell does not make claims where there are none to be made.
Get hold of everything you can by Professor Sowell and read it all.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,608
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,595

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great hook, great narrator, little payoff

  • By AU Pete on 01-03-2018

I noticed a lot of people reading this ...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-2018

... so I bought it. I shouldn't have. I found it really pretty trite and superficial stuff. The author sounds like a somewhat spoilt teenager, or perhaps a very young adult, most of the time. I really ought to have delved into the book a bit more before buying it so it's my mistake.

  • The Science of Mindfulness

  • A Research-Based Path to Well-Being
  • By: Ronald Siegel, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Ronald Siegel
  • Length: 13 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48

Ever noticed that trying to calm down often produces more agitation? Or that real fulfillment can be elusive, despite living a successful life? Often, such difficulties stem from the human brain's hardwired tendency to seek pleasure and avoid pain. Modern science demonstrates that this survival mechanism served the needs of our earliest ancestors, but is at the root of many problems that we face today, such as depression, compulsive and addictive behaviors, chronic pain, and stress and anxiety.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Comprehensive

  • By John Robinson on 29-12-2016

Interesting, but not the 'mindfulness' I sought.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-2016

There are many aspects of this course that make it worthing listening to but what those aspects are comes down to what you were seeking in the first place.
It turns out that 'mindfulness' has varying definitions that, in reality, are distinct to the point of being very different concepts. The kind of 'mindfulness' focused on throughout this course seems to me to be more akin to an endless attempt to achieve a state of mindlessness: a state in which the mind is not only 'not busy' but, rather, not active. This is not what I was seeking. For my purposes, there was an overbearing veneration of Buddhist philosophy and the ascetic/quasi-monastic (i.e. inactive) lifestyle as the prime means to well-being. I wish to be both even more active/productive and happier than I currently am.
Having said that, there were a number of valuable lessons learnt throughout. Arguably the most valuable was some instruction that allow one to be less negatively reactive to circumstances, such as losing one's temper. But, in the end, I feel that these boil down to little more than 'chill, take a breath and count to ten'. This, again, was not really what I was seeking. I want to be able react immediately but in a better way, to focus better in the immediate moment and react accordingly and appropriately. Instead, most of these tools seem to be indicated for someone who wants simply to 'be' in the moment. I want to 'be active' in the moment.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful