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Sister Luke

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  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 12
  • ratings
  • Mister Monday

  • The Keys to the Kingdom, Book 1
  • By: Garth Nix
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 36
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 35

Arthur Penhaligon is not supposed to be a hero. He is, in fact, supposed to die an early death. But then he is saved by a key shaped like the minute hand of a clock. Arthur is safe – but his world is not. Along with the key comes a plague brought by bizarre creatures from another realm. A stranger named Mister Monday, his avenging messengers with blood-stained wings, and an army of dog-faced Fetchers will stop at nothing to get the key back – even if it means destroying Arthur and everything around him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome Series

  • By Daniel Warren on 25-06-2015

A classic just as enchanting as in my boyhood

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-2019

This is a childhood favourite of mine, and I am pleased beyond words to discover it holds up equally well know that I am grown up. Garth Nix writes a cracking, original narrative with enough in the way of mythic/religious allusion and more serious themes (particularly toward the end of the series) to give it a truly epic feel. The writing style is both profoundly simple, and very good--perfect for a book aimed at children. The narrator is excellent, with a masterly control of different voices/accents (his choice of a Welshman for a coalminer, for instance, is amusing and just right.)

  • The Charioteer

  • By: Mary Renault
  • Narrated by: Joe Jameson
  • Length: 14 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3

After surviving the Dunkirk retreat, Laurie Odell, a young homosexual, critically examines his unorthodox lifestyle and personal relationships, as he falls in love with a young conscientious objector and becomes involved with a circle of world-weary gay men.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Almost.....

  • By Kenneth on 09-10-2016

Awful. Just awful.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-2018

An unforgivable mangling of a truly remarkable work. Agree with the reviewer below- the bit at the beginning, a completely inappropriate co-option of Renault's work to fit a contemporary 'Gay Rights' narrative, is insufferable and unnecessary, and contradicts completely the core messages of the book (I can only imagine they were too subtle for the writer of the foreword). The Charioteer is first and foremost a good novel, not even so much a Gay(!) novel, still less a didactic political screed.

The voices the narrator adopts for the different characters are stilted and overdone (not to mention badly done); bizarre, actually. They're like caricatures: the masculine voices are exaggeratedly deep and dense-sounding; the feminine (for which he adopts a falsetto), mean and shrill. It's excruciating to listen to. Laurie, Ralph and Andrew (who the narrator distinguishes by making him speak in a barely-audible whisper) deserve better. Mary Renault deserves better. Her peerless and singular style (of which the narrator has no discernible appreciation) deserves better. Renault's descriptions and especially dialogue perfectly and effortlessly evoke the period, but this narrator doesn't really seem to know how people in the first half of the 20th century talked. A more experienced reader would have been much better. My personal choice would be an older woman, perhaps a distinguished (theatre?) actress; someone literate enough to understand the beauty and power of what they are reading.

  • The Adventures of Tom Bombadil

  • By: J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Narrated by: Sir Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is a collection of poetry written by J. R. R. Tolkien and was first published in 1962. The audio is read by Sir Derek Jacobi and is a collection of 16 poems that contain an assortment of bestiary verse and fairy tale rhyme. It is a stunning recording that captures all the characters in their own charming and mysterious ways.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • one of my favorites

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-05-2018

A must for any Tolkien fan

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-2018

Tolkien's verse is simple and delightful and, at times, very beautiful. Derek Jacobi is, of course, inimitable.

  • Till We Have Faces

  • A Myth Retold
  • By: C. S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18

Set in the pre-Christian world of Glome on the outskirts of Greek civilization, it is a tale of two princesses: the beautiful Psyche, who is loved by the god of love himself, and Orual, Psyche's unattractive and embittered older sister, who loves Psyche with a destructive possessiveness. Her frustration and jealousy over Psyche's fate sets Orual on the troubled path of self-discovery. Lewis's last work of fiction, this is often considered his best by critics.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Story and Narration both excellent

  • By Sister Luke on 18-03-2018

Story and Narration both excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-2018

This is C.S. Lewis' best and most mature work (in his opinion as well as mine). The story is a must-read for fans of Lewis, Greek myth or literature with sensitive and moving explorations of profound spiritual, psychological and philosophical themes. Equally enjoyable by believers and non-believers, and I would imagine more palatable to the non-religious than Lewis' more blatantly didactic/allegorical works. Make no mistake, there is plenty of allegory here too, but it is first and foremost a good story. The narrator is excellent and does perfect justice to Lewis' simple, yet elegant and evocative style.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful