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  • The Elephant in the Brain

  • Hidden Motives in Everyday Life
  • By: Kevin Simler, Robin Hanson
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

Human beings are primates, and primates are political animals. Our brains, therefore, are designed not just to hunt and gather but also to help us get ahead socially, often via deception and self-deception. But while we may be self-interested schemers, we benefit by pretending otherwise. The less we know about our own ugly motives, the better - and thus, we don't like to talk, or even think, about the extent of our selfishness. This is "the elephant in the brain". 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely worth your time!

  • By Anonymous User on 28-10-2018

Definitely worth your time!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-10-2018

This was everything I expected based off other reviews, easy to digest and useful info for every day life. My only gripe was the narrator, such a well written book deserves a fitting voice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sapiens

  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,617
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,880
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,854

Earth is 4.5 billion years old. In just a fraction of that time, one species among countless others has conquered it. Us. We are the most advanced and most destructive animals ever to have lived. What makes us brilliant? What makes us deadly? What makes us sapiens? In this bold and provocative audiobook, Yuval Noah Harari explores who we are, how we got here, and where we're going.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thought-provoking

  • By Anonymous User on 30-08-2017

Interesting but not without faults

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-2018

Overall this has been a great summary of history in an easy to digest format and the author is a brilliant historian HOWEVER, he is not a biologist nor a psychologist for that matter so there are some claims throughout the book that do show some personal bias rather than subjective scientific information.

We are all human and fallible so it would be silly to get caught up on those details however when they are written as if scientific truth it’s fair to point out the errors. Many people will receive this information as ‘facts’ without actually doing any further research themselves which does a disservice to some of the fields outside of history that are misrepresented in the book. It’s fine to have some bias but to present it as truth doesn’t do anyone any favours.

Aside from these issues I stumbled across (ended up finding quite a few throughout certain chapters) the history aspect is brilliant as you would suspect from this author and I would definitely recommend this to anyone!

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,679
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,653

What are the most valuable things that everyone should know? Acclaimed clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson has influenced the modern understanding of personality, and now he has become one of the world's most popular public thinkers. In this book, he provides 12 profound and practical principles for how to live a meaningful life, from setting your house in order before criticising others to comparing yourself to who you were yesterday, not someone else today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating Read

  • By Christopher on 21-01-2018

Give it a proper shot, and keep an open mind

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-2018

I see people on here whinging about the religious undertones, and while I’m an atheist myself and was bothered at some points by the excessive amount of biblical stories throughout the book I’m also open enough to see their utility. Jordan uses a lifetime of clinical experience, his vast knowledge of cultures, history and the world to understand the human condition and if you’re bogged down by a few people stories than you’re missing the whole point! I found this to be exceptionally useful and will listen through a second time down the track to refresh some points. Dealing with nihilism is something I’ve always struggled with and if anything else just being able to manage that meant this is an absolute gem.