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Amazing

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Eat more than brains when the Zombies come

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-01-2020

Great narration, humorous, practical, thought provoking. Made me go out into the garden and plant some root veggies.

Entertaining and interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-2019

The authors presentation of his own book is fantastic, by far the best way to learn Australian history. I hope he keeps writing honest accounts all the way to modern day - worth the listen and laugh.

An uplifting story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-2019

The Audible version of this book was well worth listening too, Ahn's stories are entertaining and relatable, and hearing them in the authors voice made this an engaging and enjoyable book. I loved how Australian this book was, from Macca's to the beach markets, uni relationships and little red mazdas - it felt like Ahn could be living just around the corner - with just a few more pirate stories up his sleeve to make it interesting. Great buy.

For those who like their own space.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-01-2018

Any additional comments?

Deep Work is a well read book, with some interesting points that I will try and implement into my own work habits.I did find, however, that the author is very "introverted" in his approach, and he clearly doesn't identify with the needs of extroverts. Monastic approaches to work, where a person locks themself away to think - posting notes basically saying 'get over it' to possible distractions - are seen as 'ideal situations'. He considers social media as having 'minor benefits' - when I propose that most of the world disagrees. Connection and relationships are extremely important to people, which is why so many people feel compelled to Facetime instead of write their thesis. While the author may consider 2 weeks locked in a room a meditative experience, he should also recognise that solitary confinement is actually used as a form of torture.I did like his use of scheduling, memorising and training techniques to train the brain to like solitude and hard work - but I think I will need to find a more extroverted approach to deep work, because there is little hope of me retreating to my bat cave any time soon.

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