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droy

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  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 41
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  • The Big Lie

  • Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American Left
  • By: Dinesh D'Souza
  • Narrated by: David Cochran Heath
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41

What is "the big lie" of the Democratic Party? That conservatives - and President Donald Trump in particular - are fascists. Nazis, even. In a typical comment, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow says the Trump era is reminiscent of "what it was like when Hitler first became chancellor." But in fact, this audacious lie is a complete inversion of the truth. Yes, there is a fascist threat in America - but that threat is from the Left and the Democratic Party.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • like a stake to the heart

  • By droy on 03-08-2017

like a stake to the heart

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-2017

This is an important book for people to read regardless of their political leanings. Like previous books by D'Souza, there are hits and misses, but where he hits he hits hard. I feel the misses are an inevitable side effect of the writer's thinking style: his strengths are that he sees links between things that are usually not noticed by others, and that he has the tough-mindedness to spell out these logical trains of thought in an articulate and dramatic way. The result is often productive creativity, but when he misses it is by a mile. The biggest miss here I think in this the link drawn between abortion and Nazi science, which I think even charitable readers from the centre or left will find unconvincing at best. Such aspects can be distracting from the more important themes. The biggest hit of the book, in my opinion, is that the essential characteristics of National Socialism and fascism are actually the same as those found in communist/socialist ideology more generally. This point is made well and buttressed by a detailed discussion of these movements intellectual histories and helps highlight the essentially fascistic tactics used/endorsed by the likes of antifa and much of the ideological intelligentsia.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Elbow Room

  • The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting
  • By: Daniel C Dennett
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

In this landmark 1984 work on free will, Daniel Dennett makes a case for compatibilism. His aim, as he writes in the preface to this new edition, was a cleanup job, "saving everything that mattered about the everyday concept of free will while jettisoning the impediments". In Elbow Room, Dennett argues that the varieties of free will worth wanting - those that underwrite moral and artistic responsibility - are not threatened by advances in science but distinguished, explained, and justified in detail.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Are you a man or a sphex?

  • By droy on 02-04-2017

Are you a man or a sphex?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-2017

This is the antidote to much of the thinking, or lack of thinking, that is coming out with increasing frequency in other works regarding responsibility, blame and free will from many eminent philosophers and psychologists who really should know better. This book will be of only growing importance as behaviors become increasingly understood in terms of their neurophysiological underpinnings and as these findings collide with traditional and intuitive understandings of free will and morality--although some people may be determined to disagree (and others might be indetermined to disagree). This bpook lacks some of the helpful angles provided in Dennett's other book on the same subject (Freedom Evolves), such as Conway's lifeworld computer program and the contrarian commentary by Conway. but this book brings other aspects of the problem and so the two works are complementary and I recommend reading them both to get the most out of this. The reader's voice is also easy to listen to and friendly, so even if you know you disagree with Dennett this is a nice way to take a closer look at his views.

  • Freedom Evolves

  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Robert Blumenfeld
  • Length: 11 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Can there be freedom and free will in a deterministic world? Renowned philosopher Daniel Dennett emphatically answers "yes!" Using an array of provocative formulations, Dennett sets out to show how we alone among the animals have evolved minds that give us free will and morality. Weaving a richly detailed narrative, Dennett explains in a series of strikingly original arguments - drawing upon evolutionary biology, cognitive neuroscience, economics, and philosophy - that far from being an enemy of traditional explorations of freedom, morality, and meaning, the evolutionary perspective can be an indispensable ally.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Curing Konrad

  • By droy on 30-03-2017

Curing Konrad

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-03-2017

This book is one long argument against Konrad, a hypothetical and argumentative individual who gives voice to many misconceptions about free will that are fashionable among intellectuals today. Dennett shows convincingly how and why we have varieties of free will worth wanting. The book is a difficult one, and the fast but fun pace with which it is sassily read mean more than one listening is advised. But of any book by anyone is worth a second read it's this one.

  • Consciousness Explained

  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Paul Mantell
  • Length: 21 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

The national bestseller chosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the ten best books of 1991 is now available as an audiobook. The author of Brainstorms, Daniel C. Dennett replaces our traditional vision of consciousness with a new model based on a wealth of fact and theory from the latest scientific research.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth reading at least twice

  • By droy on 21-03-2017

Worth reading at least twice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-2017

If you didn't already know how seriously many philosophers worry about zombies then the chances are this book is not what you might expect. There is a lot to think about in here, and it wasn't until the second time I read it that I felt I understood it. I believe the book really achieves what the title promises and that this is a view that will become less controversial with time and as more becomes known. So much so that the sketch of consciousness presented here will be seen one day as ahead of its time as works such as Wealth Of Nations and Origin of Species is now seen ahead of the time they were written in. That is, a rough brilliant sketch that is mostly right and worth reading again and again and again to fully take in and enjoy.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Darwin's Dangerous Idea

  • Evolution and the Meanings of Life
  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Kevin Stillwell
  • Length: 27 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14

In a book that is both groundbreaking and accessible, Daniel C. Dennett, whom Chet Raymo of The Boston Globe calls "one of the most provocative thinkers on the planet", focuses his unerringly logical mind on the theory of natural selection, showing how Darwin's great idea transforms and illuminates our traditional view of humanity's place in the universe. Dennett vividly describes the theory itself and then extends Darwin's vision with impeccable arguments to their often surprising conclusions, challenging the views of some of the most famous scientists of our day.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Potent Stuff

  • By droy on 21-03-2017

Potent Stuff

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-2017

One of the best books on evolution I've ever read, it will likely transform the way you see the world forever. The chapter on Gould alone is worth getting this book for; it is an amazingly devastating critique of some of the most infamous and popular attempts made to contain the universal acid.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • From Bacteria to Bach and Back

  • The Evolution of Minds
  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Tom Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

What is human consciousness, and how is it possible? This question fascinates thinking people from poets and painters to physicists, psychologists, and philosophers. From Bacteria to Bach and Back is Daniel C. Dennett's brilliant answer, extending perspectives from his earlier work in surprising directions, exploring the deep interactions of evolution, brains, and human culture.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bach at it again

  • By droy on 21-03-2017

Bach at it again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-2017

A great update to his books "Consciousness Explained" and "Darwin's dangerous idea". readers will get the most from this book if they have previously listened to Dennett's books, many of which are also available on audible.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful