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Terrible narrator, good content

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-2020

terrible narration. pausing, intonation, throws you off the good content. monotone too. this should be redone. especially considering the signficance of this book to AA members

Solid fundamental information. Poorly written

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-2020

This book has good information. All contained and organised cohesively. Ross Edgley uses pyramids of priority to categorise different aspects of training and nutrition (much like Eric Helms did years ago). There is some fantastic information and science contained within this book. However, the predictability and lack of authenticity in his writing (and perhaps character) is inescapable. For a man who's accomplished such monumental feats, it's considerably difficult to find the deeper sense of meaning/character that often accompanies those who perform such spiritual odysseys. I've struggled to like him in his interviews (London Real, Joe Rogan) and I just cannot get past a sense of pseudo enthusiasm, surface level copout phrases and a slightly annoying disposition. I was really hoping this book would help me change my view of him and then perhaps I'd go on to read his next one 'The art of resilience'. Nonetheless, his writing is very formulaic, uninspired and inauthentic. Each chapter reeks of the same 'I was soo out of place with (insert situation/people' and the 'little did I know' predictable styles of expressions. The short narratives that frame the solid scientific, nutrition and exercise content have the potential to be wonderfully engaging and inspiring. However, it comes off like a collection of 'stuff' that's been put to together to write and sell a book. I'm disappointed with the read personally but I did have high expectations. I've given up on Ross Edgley as a source of inspiration, he is perhaps just a physical being and that's okay. If you're looking for a good synthesis of current information on Nutrition and Exercise, and you don't mind product placement and shameless self-promotion, then this is the book for you. This critique is perhaps harsh but I've been truly changed by books such as 'Born to Run', 'Finding Ultra' and 'Can't Hurt Me'. People like Courtney Dauwalter, Ido Portal, Dean Karnazes and Joe Rogan seem to have some inspiring underpinning to their physical pursuits which reflects a well-rounded character and view of life. I had high hopes for Ross Edgley to perform to the same caliber. It would appear though that he's not meant to write, has ulterior motives or is simply just lacking in this realm.

Delivers what you'd expect

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-08-2020

The book is filled with tips and tricks to hack your day, all referenced to scientific papers and experts. My criticism are perhaps unfounded as my expectations might not have been valid. However, it's very 'Joe Rogan'/'Tim Ferris' and 'American'. Talking mostly about the minutiae of salted water and the smoking points of oils and 'functional exercises'. The language used is very 'go get'em tiger', which is great for those of us who want a superficial surge of motivation but it works very little on the character ethic. Aubrey clearly has great intentions but this book is for those who want to have his EXACT routine rather than a more general blueprint. I do think that some of the tips extend way beyond where a layman should be focused. If you're advanced enough in your nutrition and exercise to be focusing on the things mentioned here, you're probably not reading books like this (professional athletes etc.). Also, If you're going to indulge in smoking weed or drinking, even moderately, you probably don't have to worry about your bodies alkalinity throughout the day and supplements. Some tips are really just a justification for what he does. In summary, if you've got a friend who follows every fad mentioned on Joe Rogan or Tim Ferris just ask them how to live your life and that's essentially what's in this book. Products and personality level (superficial) solutions/justifications for how this man lives his life. Some good stuff but it's mostly over-kill or overly specific 'when to drink your bullet proof coffee' type stuff.

Not much substance

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-2020

Simon Sinek is an excellent speaker, as he is in this audio-recording. Unfortunately, the whole book is really a collection of what he's said else where in his TED talks with a few more anecdotes to support a wonderful and inspiring theory. It's a good message, fine to listen to but lacking depth and variation. The books title is enough to understand everything you'll get from the book. Watch his TED talks and don't bother with this book.

Avsolutely excellent. No need to read Allan Carr

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-07-2020

A must read for any drinker. Choose to drink if you will but make an informed, wholistic decision based on reality not lies.

inspirational

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-2020

after having got into Jordan Peterson and other self help aithors avenues thus was a fantastic way to solidify and add to various ways to think about life and the world.