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Aentee

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 14
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  • The Poppy War

  • By: R. F. Kuang
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 18 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56

Opium runs through the heart of the Nikara Empire, a constant reminder of the war with the Federation of Mugen that brought it to the empire’s shores. A war that only ended thanks to three heroes - the Vipress, the Dragon Emperor and the Gatekeeper - known as the Trifecta. They were legendary figures, each bestowed with godlike powers, who united the warlords of the Empire against the Federation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Immersive and brilliant historical fantasy

  • By Aentee on 07-06-2018

Immersive and brilliant historical fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-2018

I absolutely loved this book, I alternated between reading the Kindle copy and the audiobook for my first read and it was a great experience. This is a historical fantasy based on China's complex modern history, particularly the Second Sino-Japanese war and the lead up to the Cultural Revolution. R. F. Kuang majored in International History, with a focus on modern Chinese military history, and it really shows in this book.

The Poppy War reaches the perfect balance between inspiration from historical facts and reinventing a world all its own. If you love anti-heroes and morally ambiguous characters, you will find Rin utterly fascinating. The audio performance by Emily Woo Zeller is also brilliant, I am a long-time fan of her narration and I think her voice is very emotive.

The book does get very dark, especially towards the last third. A lot of the events shown actually parallel real-life horrors, which made it all the more confronting. Content warning for genocide, rapes, murder, torture, human experimentation, self-harm, and a lot of violence. The content never felt gratuitous, but do take note that the last third of book is quite graphic before you read or listen to it.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Start with Why

  • How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action (Int'l Edit.)
  • By: Simon Sinek
  • Narrated by: Simon Sinek
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,524
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,314
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,311

Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their successes over and over? People like Martin Luther King, Jr.; Steve Jobs; and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why. Their natural ability to start with why enabled them to inspire those around them and to achieve remarkable things.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Don't waste your time

  • By clinton on 14-03-2016

Watch the TED talk, skip the book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-04-2018

Simon Sinek has an amazing TED talk on YouTube that perfectly captures this book in 20 minutes. The concept he proposes is inspiring but simple, definitely not enough for fill a 5+ hours audiobook. Unless you want to hear about how visionary Apple is for hours on end, I would not recommend the book.

  • A Court of Mist and Fury

  • By: Sarah J. Maas
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 23 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 439
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 407
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 407

Feyre survived Amarantha's clutches to return to the Spring Court - but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can't forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin's people. Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms - and she might be key to stopping it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Must Read!!!!

  • By Megs on 20-05-2016

Jarring narration, but a fantastic sequel.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-2016

I thought this was a much stronger book compared to A Court of Thorns and Fury. Emotionally powerful, but I thought some of the characterisation were inconsistent, especially Feyre, Lucien, Rhys and Tamlin.

I could not stand the narrator at first, her voice made Feyre sound petulant and whiny. Her voices for the characters also sounded very similar to one another. If I hadn't read this book before listening to the audiobook I would have been utterly confused.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Name of the Wind

  • The Kingkiller Chronicle, Book 1
  • By: Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 28 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,585
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,367
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,362

I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. My name is Kvothe.You may have heard of me.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Gretta on 18-03-2015

A plodding story saved by beautiful narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-2016

Would you consider the audio edition of The Name of the Wind to be better than the print version?

Yes. I read the book many years ago and found it was difficult to follow, with the plot jumping all over the show without much purpose. I felt Kvothe's story is much more suited to audiobook - especially given the unique set up of the story.

What about Rupert Degas’s performance did you like?

Degas was great at keeping the voices of all the different characters distinct. I did think his female voices all sounded a bit petulant - but again, they were all unique.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Given the length, I do not think this is possible. I also think that given the immense amount of fillers in this book - listening to it in sessions is the best idea.

Any additional comments?

Despite what I said about the aimless plot - The Name of the Wind is a pleasure to both read and listen to, such is the power in Patrick Rothfuss's quotes. Unfortunately, I found that The Wise Man's Fear was a poor follow up to this promising novel.