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  • Black Rednecks and White Liberals

  • By: Thomas Sowell
  • Narrated by: Hugh Mann
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 55

This explosive new audiobook challenges many of the long-held assumptions about blacks, about Jews, about Germans and Nazis, about slavery, and about education. Plainly written, powerfully reasoned, and backed with a startling array of documented facts, Black Rednecks and White Liberals takes on the trendy intellectuals of our times as well as historic interpreters of American life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening

  • By Anonymous User on 06-01-2019

For a true understanding of history, listen to this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-2018

Interesting and logical!
History makes a lot more sense without the one sided view, well worth a listen!

  • The Road to Wigan Pier

  • By: George Orwell
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Northam
  • Length: 7 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60

A graphic and biting polemic that still holds a fierce political relevance and impact despite being written over half a century ago. First published in 1937 it charts George Orwell's observations of working-class life during the 1930s in the industrial heartlands of Yorkshire and Lancashire. His depictions of social injustice and rising unemployment, the dangerous working conditions in the mines amid general squalor and hunger also bring together many of the ideas explored in his later works and novels.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great book

  • By Amazon Customer on 21-01-2019

How much has changed without much changing at all

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-09-2018

Orwell could be describing my law lecturer of today when he speaks of the left leaning self professed virtuous socialist who knows nothing of the class in which he proclaims to care about. Well written and eye opening, leaving you with the idea that that socialism had a potential before being dragged into a polarising fight by marxism.