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Japanese Destroyer Captain Audiobook

Japanese Destroyer Captain: Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, Midway - The Great Naval Battles Seen Through Japanese Eyes

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Publisher's Summary

This highly regarded war memoir was a best seller in both Japan and the United States during the 1960s and has long been treasured by historians for its insights into the Japanese side of the surface war in the Pacific. The author was a survivor of more than one hundred sorties against the Allies and was known throughout Japan as the Unsinkable Captain.

A hero to his countrymen, Capt. Hara exemplified the best in Japanese surface commanders: highly skilled, hard driving, and aggressive. Moreover, he maintained a code of honor worthy of his samurai grandfather, and, as readers of this book have come to appreciate, he was as free with praise for American courage and resourcefulness as he was critical of himself and his senior commanders.

©1967 Tameichi Hara (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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  • Saman
    Houston, TX, United States
    7/11/14
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    "Combat, Fear, Survival!"

    If you want a page tuner – this is it!

    The author, Captain Tameichi Hara is a brave, resilient and a lucky individual. He himself states that his survival in WWII is owed to luck rather than any strategic brilliance. But throughout his surface campaigns, he shows that he is a brilliant commander to his loyal men and a tough and experienced naval fighter. He pulls no punches on his superiors for their ineptitude in battle, the suicidal and piece-meal deployments, and utter chaotic command strategy. Even the famed Admiral Yamamoto does not escape his criticism. Yet, he himself is self-deprecating in more than one occasion.

    This is the first book I read about the Japanese view point in WWII. It is a fascinating history of the men who fought this war against a far superior opponent who eventually annhilated the IJN. Even to the end, knowing fully that the war was lost, these men fought on. The final IJN sortie, Operation Ten-Go, is harrowing in its description.

    This is the finest WWII book I have ever read.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Neil
    San Francisco, CA, United States
    16/07/14
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    Story
    "Excellent account from the Japanese point of View"

    This is an excellent book from Captain Hara who was on numerous major missions including the invasion of the Philippines, Guadalcanal, Savo Island, and Midway. He criticized the admirals including Yamamoto who he felt should not have commanded the Japanese Navy. And he saw that the Japanese were reacting to the US and not proactive in the war. Most books I have read on the Pacific War are from the US point of View, so this is refreshing to read it from a Japanese Captain. He was also a Nanking, but he played down the atrocities. He later admitted to being an alcoholic so there was honesty there. There are real accounts of his battles with the allies, and he notes a few time how the allies evasive tactics were superior to the Japanese. He goes through the battles concisely and meticulously so if you want details of what happen that night then this is the book for you. He also fired upon John Kennedy;s PT boat, which he give a brief account.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Jean
    Santa Cruz, CA, United States
    28/11/14
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    "Rousing tale of fear overcome"

    This book was first published in Japan in 1958 and then in 1961 by the Naval Institute Press. The autobiography was highly regarded at the time both in Japan and the United States. The book was released as an audio book on November 11, 2013. Historians have used the book for insights into the Japanese side of the surface war in the Pacific. The author was a survivor of more than one hundred sorties against the Allies and was known in Japan as the “unsinkable captain.”

    The book begins with Captain Hara recounting his early life and his time at Eta Jima, Japan’s Naval Academy. The book has anecdotes about his personal life, life aboard ship and “behind-the-scenes” events which made the book absolutely a super read. Captain Hara was highly regarded in Japan. He wrote a manual for the Navy on torpedo warfare. He followed a code of honor similar to his grandfather who was a samurai.

    The author was free with praise for American courage and resourcefulness. He also had praise for and was critical of the Japanese Navy and himself. Hara states that the Japanese combatants made more tactical mistakes than their American counterparts. He also specifically faults Tokyo with cronyism and acquiescing too often to the Army. He states the military would have been much better if advancement in rank was based on merit rather than political and birth class.

    Hara’s war began around Formosa and the inland sea during the 1930s. He was part of the diversionary forces that attacked the Philippines. Contrary to the title of the book he was not at Pearl Harbor. Captain Hara was a destroyer squadron commander aboard the destroyer Shiqure. Most of the book describes the battles in the Java Sea and the Solomon Island Campaign where Captain Hara participated in most of the major actions. Brian Nishii narrated the book. If you are interested in World War II Pacific theatre this is a book for you.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • David
    Halethorpe, MD, United States
    29/04/15
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    "A thrilling war memoir"

    This book really made me want to break out one of my World War II wargames. Come to think of it, I don't have a good WWII wargame simulating naval combat in the Pacific...

    Tameichi Hara was, as the title indicates, the real deal — a Japanese destroyer captain who saw intense combat in the Pacific theater and was present at some of the biggest battles in World War II. (The subtitle is a bit misleading, though; he was not at Pearl Harbor, and he was only peripherally involved in Midway.) He was bombed, torpedoed, and wounded, lost men, he sunk allied ships and submarines, and his own ship got sunk from beneath him and while bobbing in the waves, he watched the Battleship Yamato go down in one of the last battles of the war.

    This war memoir is fascinating and thrilling, as Hara gives an up close and personal account of many of the great battles of the Pacific War. He describes the precise movements of ships and the ranges at which they fired their weapons with the memory of a go player playing back a game, and he really brings to life the fear, tension, uncertainty, and fog of war that plagued both sides, as well as providing a fast education on naval warfare and the different classes of ships. (I will no longer be confused about the differences between a destroyer, a cruiser, a battlecruiser, and a battleship.) This really is a great book for wargamers for whom torpedoes and submarines and air support is usually just an abstraction. Commander Hara describes in great detail how Japan won its share of battles, but lost the war.

    For the latter, he places a great deal of blame on the high command. Of course — when do the front-line warfighters not blame the admirals and generals back home for being out of touch? But Hara's open criticism of Japan's leadership, including the revered Admiral Yamamoto, was almost shocking when he first published this memoir. Yamamoto, the architect of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, who feared that the Empire had "awoken a sleeping giant," was, according to Hara, a great leader of men, but a very poor strategic commander of ships.

    He also criticizes his country's leadership for not negotiating for peace sooner and, like, I suppose, all defeated military officers, claims to have thought the war was a bad idea from the beginning.

    The insight into Hara's state of mind was quite interesting to me, and while he talked candidly at times about how he felt, I could not help suspecting that he was being a bit opaque, if not perhaps glossing over his perspective in hindsight. He describes feeling sorry for American sailors he saw floating in the open ocean, calling for help, and radioed his fleet to send another ship to pick them up as he couldn't stop. (Supposedly, they were later rescued and became POWs.) He also tells his crew to respect the enemy they have killed, he forbids physical discipline on his ship, and he altogether sounds like a great officer, an honorable man, the quintessential good soldier fighting for a bad cause. On the other hand, he dismisses the rape of Nanking as "much exaggerated," and while he seemed to respect the enemy and bear no personal animosity towards them, he never once examines what Japan was actually doing in the territories it conquered, outside his limited domain of naval warfare.

    No doubt he had feelings about that which he kept to himself. If he was inclined to defend his country, he wouldn't have looked too good in the post-war years, and if he were more critical, he might have been seen as disloyal. Supposedly Hara did become a pacifist, and he interviewed other former officers (Japanese and American) while writing his book. He was a national hero for a losing cause; a difficult situation for any man to be in.

    I highly recommend this memoir for anyone with an interest in World War II history.

    The narration by Brian Nishi is top-notch, with flawless intonation on the Japanese names.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • william
    3/06/14
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    "A new story to the battle of the Pacific"

    a very interesting story of the Japanese naval effort in the Pacific leaves one wondering why they ever started the war with Pearl

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Harry Boyle
    Irmo, SC, United States
    1/08/15
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    Story
    "Japan wins WW 2"
    What did you like best about Japanese Destroyer Captain? What did you like least?

    As you listen, the story initially seems to be interesting. That changes by mid-listen.

    If you think about the story it is opinionated to the point the book at best becomes no more than average. The narrator did a good job and was good enough to keep me listening.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    The war as the author plays it out is interesting and often you feel like maybe you are there with him. The least interesting part was that the author paints the Japanese officers as stupid. For many months as his boats were in for repair he manages to be out of combat. He continually makes the American commanders seem inept and not capable, except in isolated battles, to lead or make good combat decisions. For all of his perceived leadership qualities it is a wonder he was a destroyer captain. Maybe he thought his status should have be elevated and because it was not, he takes after the fact potshots at the leadership.


    Could you see Japanese Destroyer Captain being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

    Do not see a movie being done on this one. A legend in his own mind is unlikely to be made into a movie.


    Any additional comments?

    This was one of the few books I have read or listened to from the American enemies viewpoint. Yet in the end this book is all about the blunders of war which could have been penned much better without a destroyer captain second guessing every action of his commanders.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • S. Oneill
    10/05/15
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    "Other side of the hill"

    Well written personal story, does not hold back on mistakes.

    Well worth the read for anyone interested in the Pacific War

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Dan McGrew
    Safford, AZ
    13/02/14
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    Story
    "Hara Rules"
    What made the experience of listening to Japanese Destroyer Captain the most enjoyable?

    The Japanese perspective of the naval war in the Pacific, as well as his observations on the Japanese High Command and political system. He brought a human face to the Japanese fighting men.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Japanese Destroyer Captain?

    His observations and discriptions of the Soloman Islands Campaign. The Americans use of Radar, Tactics and industrial might vs that of the Japanese.


    Any additional comments?

    this book was writen before the release of information on Allied decoding of Japanese radio transmissions. While Hara was a Torpedo expert, he wrote Japans pre-war manual, he was silent on the very poor performance of American Torpedos.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Scott Rose
    29/05/15
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    "There are two sides to every story"

    A viewpoint of the Pacific war that is not commonly thought about. It was interesting seeing the conflict through Japanese eyes.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Alex
    2/11/16
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    "Fantastic story and spectacular narration."

    Spectacular naval stories told from the rare perspective of a Japanease officer. The narration is easy to follow and I often found myself engrossed into listening a few chapters of the story.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • S. Morris
    London, UK
    18/06/16
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    "Good Men In A Bad War"

    I came upon this second world war memoir by chance and immediately purchased
    it. I have an interest in memoirs from the second world war and in
    particular those from a naval perspective. However, what I find most
    interesting are those accounts that come from what we in the west would call
    the enemy at the time. There are plenty of war time accounts from those that
    served in the Allies but rarer are those from the other side of this
    conflict. With such memoirs the reader is able to obtain a fascinating
    insight into how battles were fought as well as the internal politics of a
    nation fighting to survive which brings some greater degree of balance to
    the overall picture of many of the key events of such conflicts. This book
    is an excellent and often captivating as well as revealing look through the
    eyes of a Japanese naval officer and his participation in several key
    battles of the Pacific war.

    The author recounts in detail the successes and failures of the Imperial
    Japanese navy in terms of its battles and policies and paints a picture of a
    thoughtful man who is not afraid to question the higher echelons of command.
    In addition, we see a man who belies the often fanatical portrayal of
    suicidal Japanese military men that dispels the stereotype of the cruel and
    pitiless Japanese fighter. This is a book that doesn't simply tell the story
    of his days serving during this conflict but also lets us know the emotional
    state of this incredible man too. It is not uncommon for the author to
    recount instances of where he has wept over men lost under his command as
    well as pay his respects to enemy sailors that perished at his hands.
    Reading these memoirs from those that fought on the other side during the
    second world war allows one to see that there were good men that fought on
    both sides of that war as well as bad ones.

    The narrator is clearly of Japanese herritage and does an excellent job with
    all the Japanese references with his perfect pronunciation and this is
    fitting as a non-Japanese English speaker would have butchered the correct
    saying of the numerous Japanese places and names given in this book.

    For those of you interested like me in naval memoirs of this time period it
    might be of interest to note that this book briefly covers the actions which
    sunk the USS Houston and HAMS Perth and so to compliment this memoir there
    is a superb book telling the survivors stories of the men of the Houston and
    Perth available on Audible entitled "Ship of Ghosts" that I urge those
    interested to read.

    Japanese Destroyer Captain: Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, Midway - The Great Naval Battles Seen Through Japanese Eyes is an utterly fascinating detailed account that really gives the
    reader a flavour of what life was like at the time and is a highly thought
    provoking read and an absolute must for anyone interested in this subject
    matter. For those that might be interested, I can thoroughly recommend two
    other naval memoirs that I am afraid are not available on Audible as yet but
    are a great read and these are the excellent "Steel Boat, Iron heart" and
    "Iron Coffins". Both titles deal with the German U-Boat war from those that
    served aboard them and are equally insightful and fascinating.

    Highly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Quincy
    London
    27/02/15
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    Story
    "Great account of a remarkable Captain"
    Any additional comments?

    I am disappointed that the book ends rather suddenly after the sinking of Cruiser Yahagi, no mention of the Atomic Bombings of Japan, or her eventual surrender.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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